N-100

    Nasdaq-100 Index®

    The Nasdaq-100 Index (NDX®) defines today’s modern-day industrials—comprised of 100 of the largest and most innovative non-financial companies listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market based on market capitalization.

    Invest in the Nasdaq-100® Your Way

    The Nasdaq-100 is one of the world’s preeminent large-cap growth indexes. The companies in the Nasdaq-100 include 100-plus of the largest domestic and international non-financial companies listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market based on market capitalization. While ETFs and mutual funds are among the easiest ways to gain exposure to the Nasdaq-100, you might also consider the futures, options and annuities that track this iconic index. However you invest, you can do so knowing that the value of exchange traded products alone tracking the Nasdaq-100 Index (NDX) exceeded $300 billion at the end of 2021. This proven performance is the cornerstone of the Nasdaq-100.

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    The Nasdaq-100 is one of the world’s preeminent large-cap growth indexes. The companies in the Nasdaq-100 include 100-plus of the largest domestic and international non-financial companies listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market based on market capitalization. While ETFs and mutual funds are among the easiest ways to gain exposure to the Nasdaq-100, you might also consider the futures, options and annuities that track this iconic index. However you invest, you can do so knowing that the value of exchange traded products alone tracking the Nasdaq-100 Index (NDX) exceeded $300 billion at the end of 2021. This proven performance is the cornerstone of the Nasdaq-100.

    Get Started ->

    Nasdaq-100 Performance

    Nasdaq-100 vs. S&P 500

    Indexes Chart

    Nasdaq-100 Companies List

    Home to some of the world’s most innovative companies

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    Get to know the Nasdaq-100

    The Nasdaq-100 is home to many high-performing companies from popular sectors like technology, healthcare, consumer goods & services, and industrials. Get to know the Index by exploring the full list of Nasdaq-100 companies.

    Nasdaq-100 Index Companies ->
    Nasdaq 100 History Of Innovation

    Nasdaq-100: Innovating for 37 years and counting

    CLICK TO EXPLORE

    1985

    The Nasdaq-100 Makes Its Market Debut

    1993

    Rapid growth amidst a recession

    1994

    Evolving into NDX

    1997

    A bullish era has the NDX soaring

    1998

    NDX welcomes international high performers

    1999

    The NDX ETF era begins

    2000

    Dotcoms drive investors over the top

    2008

    Recovery following a deep recession

    2013

    A breathtaking rise and a robust new member

    2019

    Ongoing outperformance

    2021

    A strong finish despite high volatility

    1985

    The Nasdaq-100 Makes Its Market Debut

    The National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) launches the Nasdaq-100 — an index of the largest domestic, non-financial companies listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market — with a base price of 250. This subset of the Nasdaq Composite Index is seen as a way to better support the creation of derivative trading instruments, such as options and futures.

    1993

    Rapid growth amidst a recession

    After it closes near 800, the Nasdaq-100 is reset to 125 — one-half its previous value — in what is effectively a two-for-one split that acknowledges the index’s rapid growth and future potential. The index’s superior performance occurred against a backdrop of recession, making it all the more remarkable.

    1994

    Evolving into NDX

    The first product tied to the index is an index option contract, introduced by the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE). Under ticker symbol “NDX,” this contract is cash-settled. Today, these contracts are traded under ticker symbol “NDX,” and are available on Nasdaq’s option exchanges — Nasdaq PHLX, Nasdaq ISE, and Nasdaq GEMX.

    1997

    A bullish era has the NDX soaring

    The NDX closes at 1,000 points for the first time during a period of US economic expansion unrivaled since the end of World War II, fueled by robust consumer spending, jobs growth, low inflation, and a burgeoning Tech industry centered on the Internet.

    1998

    NDX welcomes international high performers

    Foreign companies are now admitted to the NDX, distinguishing it further from the S&P 500 Index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which only include U.S companies. For its part, NDX simply requires that a firm be listed on the Nasdaq. The international enterprises welcomed into the NDX enjoy new liquidity benefits.

    1999

    The NDX ETF era begins

    To make the NDX serve as the basis of an exchange-traded fund (ETF), Nasdaq modifies the traditional market capitalization-derived weights in a special rebalance. Fast forward to March 1999, the QQQ ETF launched tracking the Nasdaq-100, making it the first ETF allowing investors to buy into the top 100 non-financial names listed on Nasdaq via a single share of stock.

    2000

    Dotcoms drive investors over the top

    The NDX reaches a new peak above 4,000 as the stocks of dotcom companies surge. Equity market valuations continue to increase at a turbocharged rate during this era, with the Nasdaq Composite rising from under 1,000 to more than 5,000 over a five-year period.

    2008

    Recovery following a deep recession

    Financial crisis strikes. Nasdaq-100 drops back down to 1,036.51 from its peak of 2,238.98 on Oct 31, 2007. It bottomed earlier and recovered faster than SPX, partly as a by-product of excluding Financials.

    2013

    A breathtaking rise and a robust new member

    In May 2013, as the Great Recession finally abates, the index begins a rapid ascent, climbing beyond 3,000 for the first time since November 2000. The following two months, in June and July 2013, NDX welcomes Netflix and Tesla as new components with market capitalizations of about $12 and $15 billion, respectively.

    2019

    Ongoing outperformance

    The NDX soars above 8,000 and continues its growth, having its best year since 2009 and cementing an historic 10 years of besting the S&P Index every calendar year other than 2016. The 2019 rebound includes strong performances across nearly all sectors and market caps.

    2021

    A strong finish despite high volatility

    Despite the arrival of Omicron, a new variant of COVID-19, the Nasdaq-100 finishes the year with a total return of nearly 28% and a closing level of 16,320, up more than 130% from its pandemic lows in March 2020.

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    Nasdaq-100 Research & Education

    Articles & Insights

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    Nasdaq-100 Shows Tomorrow’s Technology

    ESG

    Global Index Watch

    Global Index Watch (GIW), Nasdaq’s web-based index delivery service, provides index weights and components via an easy-to-use web interface