Markets

Amazon Extends Work-From-Home Order Through January

Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) announced on Wednesday that it will be extending its remote work policy until Jan. 8, 2021. The most recent work-from-home order was set to expire on Oct. 2.

While the company didn't detail how many of its employees would be affected by the order, it said the policy is "global guidance." At last count, Amazon's full- and part-time staff numbered 840,000, though the remote work order doesn't apply to its warehouse and fulfillment employees, or its delivery workers. 

Woman holding baby and talking on phone while using laptop in home office.

Image source: Getty Images.

"We continue to prioritize the health of our employees and follow local government guidance. Employees who work in a role that can effectively be done from home are welcome to do so until January 8th," an Amazon spokesperson explained. "We have invested significant funds and resources to keep those who choose to come to the office safe through physical distancing, deep cleaning, temperature checks, and by providing face coverings and hand sanitizer." 

Amazon revealed the extent of the costs during its first-quarter financial report, when CEO Jeff Bezos said: "[W]e're not thinking small ... we expect to spend the entirety of that $4 billion [in operating profit], and perhaps a bit more, on COVID-related expenses[.]" 

The e-commerce giant joins a growing list of technology companies that are extending their work-from-home orders and -- in some cases -- making them permanent.

Both Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) and Google, a division of Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG), recently told employees that they'll likely be working remotely through the end of the year. 

Jack Dorsey, CEO of both Twitter (NYSE: TWTR) and Square (NYSE: SQ), went a step further. He first told Twitter employees that they would have the option of working from home "forever," if their jobs permitted it. The company then extended the same courtesy to employees who work for Square. 

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John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Randi Zuckerberg, a former director of market development and spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Danny Vena owns shares of Alphabet (A shares), Amazon, Facebook, and Square. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Facebook, Square, and Twitter and recommends the following options: short September 2020 $70 puts on Square, short January 2022 $1940 calls on Amazon, and long January 2022 $1920 calls on Amazon. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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