Personal Finance
HRB

Why H&R Block, Inc. Stock Is Down 28% So Far This Year

Rsz

Image source: Getty Images.

What:H&R Block, Inc. (NYSE: HRB) shares have fallen 28.6% from the beginning of 2016 through July 31, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data.

So what: The tax-preparation giant's stock began a multi-month decline in early March, when the company released its fiscal 2016 third-quarter results. Block reported a revenue decrease of $34.5 million, to $474.5 million, which it blamed primarily on lower volumes at its U.S. assisted tax preparation offices. The company also cited the divestiture of H&R Block Bank, and foreign currency translation, as secondary factors underlying the revenue drop.

Investors were also troubled by a 6.1% decline in total returns prepared by or through H&R Block through the end of the third quarter. The assisted tax preparation market has been in decline for some years, as more consumers choose the "do-it-yourself," or DIY route to tax preparation. Notably, competitor Intuit Inc. (NASDAQ: INTU) enjoyed 15% unit growth in its DIY market-leading TurboTax Online software during this year's tax season. H&R Block management cited TurboTax's strength as one reason its own online DIY tax product experienced a 2.6% volume decline in 2016.

Now what: The company's fourth-quarter report, issued June 9, brought some relief to investors. While Block ended the fiscal year with a net decline of 6% in assisted returns, the fourth quarter wasn't appreciably worse than the third -- most of the assisted tax prep volume decline occurred early in the tax season.

Additionally, even as the company's 2016 net profit margin dropped by more than 300 basis points, and net income fell 21% to $384 million, shareholders appeared to appreciate the fact that earnings per share decreased only 12.5% versus the prior year. That's because management utilized the organization's balance sheet to repurchase an eye-raising 20.5% of shares outstanding during fiscal 2016.

H&R Block shares jumped more than 12.5% the day after its fourth-quarter earnings release, although they're still down substantially for the year. Looking forward, the divestiture of H&R Block Bank, which was completed in late 2015, will be a net positive for the company. Block will have a lighter capital structure going forward, and more importantly, management will be able to focus more closely on Block's core tax business.

Focus will indeed be needed to execute on product development and marketing if the company is to wrest market share back from Intuit and other smaller competitors. Since Block is so concentrated in the tax business, shareholders looking for progress will have to wait patiently for fiscal 2017's third quarter to get an early read on the next tax season. That reporting won't occur until March of next year. Until then, investors may have to content themselves with Block's ample dividend, which currently yields roughly 3.7%.

A secret billion-dollar stock opportunity

The world's biggest tech company forgot to show you something, but a few Wall Street analysts and the Fool didn't miss a beat: There's a small company that's powering their brand-new gadgets and the coming revolution in technology. And we think its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early in-the-know investors! To be one of them, just click here .

Asit Sharma has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Intuit. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

In This Story

HRB INTU

Other Topics

Stocks

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, VA., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world's greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, radio show, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company's name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king -- without getting their heads lopped off.

Learn More