Markets

Why Amicus Therapeutics Skyrocketed 21% in July

A month after filing for approval for Galafold in the EU, investors sent shares in surging ahead by 21.5% in July, according to data from .

A month after filing for approval for Galafold in the EU, investors sent shares in Amicus Therapeutics surging ahead by 21.5% in July, according to data from S&P Capital IQ .

The filing for approval could mean that Galafold is available as a new therapy for Fabry disease patients as early as next year. If so, Galafold will compete against two of the planet's highest-priced drugs: Sanofi 's Fabrazyme and Shire 's Replagal. Those drugs cost $200,000 annually and combined had more than $990 million in sales last year.

Fabrazyme and Replagal replace the alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A) enzyme that is missing in Fabry disease patients, but instead of replacing alpha Gal A, Galafold helps patients who still produce some of the enzyme use it more effectively. Because Galafold has a different mechanism of action than Fabrazyme and Replagal, there's also a potential for its use as an adjunct to these therapies. Studies are ongoing that are evaluating Galafold alongside these drugs and if those studies pan out Galafold could become part of a standard of care for most Fabry disease patients.

Even if those studies fail, however, there could still be a nine-figure market opportunity for Galafold. Amicus Therapeutics estimates that about half of all Fabry disease patients could benefit from taking it as a monotherapy.

Of course, there's no guarantee that the EU regulators will approve Galafold, so investors will need to wait and see what the EU's advisory committee recommends. That committee should offer up its decision before year-end and that could clear the way for an official go-no-go decision in 2016.

Investors also ought to know that Amicus Therapeutics has yet to file for U.S. approval of Galafold, something the company's management expects to do before the end of this year. If Amicus Therapeutics executes on that timeline, then an FDA decision could come by the end of 2016, too.

The next billion-dollar iSecret

The world's biggest tech company forgot to show you something at its recent event, but a few Wall Street analysts and the Fool didn't miss a beat: There's a small company that's powering their brand-new gadgets and the coming revolution in technology. And we think its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early in-the-know investors! To be one of them, just click here .

The article Why Amicus Therapeutics Skyrocketed 21% in July originally appeared on Fool.com.

Todd Campbell owns shares of Amicus Therapeutics,. Todd owns E.B. Capital Markets, LLC. E.B. Capital's clients may have positions in the companies mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

Copyright © 1995 - 2015 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

In This Story

FOLD

Other Topics

Stocks

Latest Markets Videos

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, VA., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world's greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, radio show, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company's name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king -- without getting their heads lopped off.

Learn More