UK PM Johnson "really pleased" with work done to reopen schools

Credit: REUTERS/POOL

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday he was "really pleased" by the work done to get ready to reopen schools from next week, a test of his government after it failed to return all children to schools earlier this year.

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LONDON, Aug 25 (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday he was "really pleased" by the work done to get ready to reopen schools from next week, a test of his government after it failed to return all children to schools earlier this year.

Johnson, whose Conservative government has come under fire for how it has tackled education during the coronavirus crisis, said it was "crucial" for all children to return to school and that he would look at medical evidence to see whether he should change the government's advice on wearing face coverings.

After his government was criticised for its handling of exam results this month and failed to bring all children back to school before the summer holidays, Johnson wants to show his government can preside over a full-time return to school.

"I'm really pleased by the work that teachers, schools, parents, pupils have done to get ready," he said on a visit in southwest England.

Questioned over whether England would have to change its policy on not advising some children to wear face coverings at school as Scotland has, Johnson said: "You know, we'll look at the changing medical evidence as we go on. If we need to change the advice, then of course we will."

Johnson has been criticised for his government's wider response to the pandemic, accused by opposition parties and medics for being too slow to lock down, too quick to ease restrictions and for failing to test enough people.

A U-turn on using an algorithm to determine exam results this month added to that criticism, with Keir Starmer, leader of the main opposition Labour Party, branding the government "incompetent".

(Reporting by Sarah Young, writing by Elizabeth Piper; editing by Stephen Addison)

((elizabeth.piper@thomsonreuters.com; 07979746994; Reuters Messaging: elizabeth.piper.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net))

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