Markets

Pre-Opening Corn Market Report for 5/6/2011

July corn was down 10 1/2 cents late in the overnight session. Outside market forces remain negative with lower energy and metal markets, while the dollar is quiet. There were 287 deliveries against the May corn this morning. With a bearish tilt to outside markets, a weaker export demand tone and a steady shift to a drier weather pattern for the western Corn Belt, the market remains under pressure from speculative long liquidation selling. Open interest is down 169,713 contracts since April 19th, which suggests a steady flow of liquidation. The northern plains and Midwest look to receive scattered light rains into the weekend and better rains for the Tuesday through Friday time frame, which could slow planting progress. However, warmer weather is also coming, and it looks drier after next Friday. Extended models, show a colder and wetter pattern for the eastern Corn Belt, out into the 8-14 day time frame. This could keep planting progress slow for Indiana and Ohio. The market closed sharply lower on the session yesterday, led by weakness in outside markets and declining demand fears. Talk of slow export sales and some talk of a drier window for planting after another week of scattered rain events in the Midwest helped to pressure prices. Weekly export sales for corn came in at just 284,200 metric tonnes, which was well below trade expectations and the lowest since October. Cumulative corn sales stand at 82.8% of the USDA forecast for 2010/11 (current) marketing year versus a 5 year average of 81.9%. Sales of 474,000 metric tonnes are needed each week to reach the USDA forecast. July corn has pushed to the lowest level since March 31st and also filled the gap left after the stocks and acreage reports. December corn has managed to hold above last week's lows.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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