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Pre-IPO Insider: Here's Your Chance To Be A Broadway Producer

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After two consecutive seasons of record box office receipts and attendance, Broadway is back.

The hit musical Hamilton has gone viral on everything from social media to political headlines. The show brought in $74 million during the 2015/2016 season with investors now making $13 million annually.

And Hamilton wasn't even the biggest Broadway draw last year. That title went to perennial-hit The Lion King, which brought in almost $103 million, about 7.5% of the total $1.37 billion in Broadway ticket sales for the season ended in May.

Getting in on movie and musical productions has always required high-profile connections and big money, the kind of money only the top 1% had to invest. Those connected, well-heeled investors enjoyed the bragging rights -- and, occasionally, the returns -- of making a hit production happen.

That was then, this is now: Say hello to the first-ever opportunity for regular investors like you and me to invest in a Broadway show.

A High-Risk, High-Return Investment With Perks To Boot

Starring Clara Bow is the story of Hollywood's most popular silent movie star, and it's the first Broadway show available for investment to the other 99%.

Growing up in a Brooklyn tenement, a movie magazine contest took Clara to Hollywood and stardom in the 1920s.

It's one of Hollywood's first rags-to-riches stories and has all the makings of a Broadway hit.

The production team consists of a "who's who" of entertainment players and producers including Barry Fasman, producer of 32 songs for NBC's hit show "Fame" and U.K. Music and Video Magazine's Top Record Producer of 1982.

Founders estimate a cost of up to $10 million to produce and launch on Broadway and they're taking it to equity crowdfunding for the first musical available to regular investors. The company already owns the song rights and is raising money to put choreography together.

Any investor can get in on Starring Clara Bow for as little as $100 on the StartEngine crowdfunding portal. The company is raising up to $1 million through a common share offer at $10 per share. Besides the potential for a profitable investment, check out the perks:

- A $500 investment includes an autographed poster signed by the author, composer and cast members as well as direct email access to the author and composer.

- A $1,000 investment includes the above plus six free tickets to the first workshop production performance.

- Higher investments include perks like VIP access to the set in Hollywood and Executive Producer credit on the show.

The Broadway hit Hamilton cost $12.5 million to make and now grosses $2 million a week. Revenue streams include ticket sales, regional touring shows, licensing and book rights. Profits can continue to come in years after a show's commercial life with ownership of rights for license to other productions.

As with all investments, I encourage you to do your own due diligence.

I haven't yet done detailed market and valuation analysis on Starring Clara Bow, but it's an investment that's on my radar. Only subscribers to StreetAuthority's Pre-IPO Millionaire advisory have access to the hottest startups that are getting my full-fledged analysis and recommendations. Click here to get started .

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.