Markets

Montpelier Re Looks to Keep Climbing

Source: Montpelier Re.

Once again, though, Montpelier Re earned slight gains in its book value. Accounting for restricted shares outstanding, Montpelier Re's book value climbed almost 3% for the quarter, to $33.19 per share. That amounted to a 15% rise for full-year 2014, and it also puts the stock's valuation at less than 1.1 times book value, which some would see as a relative bargain even though the company actually posted a slight negative return on its investment portfolio.

As we saw in the previous quarter, Montpelier Re's loss experience was much worse than it was for the same quarter of 2013. Current-year losses and loss-adjustment expenses climbed almost 69% compared to the fourth quarter of 2013, sending its combined ratio up more than 21 percentage points to 60.7%. For the year, the rise in combined ratio was more modest, and at 65.6%, Montpelier Re is still enjoying an incredibly good run with its underwriting practices.

Will Montpelier Re keep seeing falling earnings?

Montpelier Re's leaders counted 2014 as a success. "All operating segments delivered strong profitability," said CEO Christopher Harris, "driving an increase in book value per share." Yet Harris warned investors should prepare for less impressive results during the first quarter of 2015, with expectations for flat premium volume as "planned growth in Individual Risk and Other Specialty lines offset the impact of targeted reductions in Property Catastrophe."

Montpelier Re also continued its aggressive share repurchase program, albeit not at the same pace it followed in the third quarter. Montpelier Re spent about $31.9 million buying back just over 1 million shares of stock at an average price of just over $31.75 per share. The company has had good timing with its repurchases, as the current stock price is 14% higher than that average purchase price, allowing Montpelier Re to continue reducing its share count and boosting per-share figures.

Investors should keep an eye on the expense side of the business. Montpelier Re saw acquisition costs climb more than three percentage points to 17.7%, and operating expenses also rose slightly. As losses return to more normal conditions, Montpelier Re will need the discipline to rein in overhead costs in order to keep as much capital for shareholders as possible.

Montpelier Re continues to take advantage of good conditions in the reinsurance market, and those factors don't appear likely to turn anytime soon. It only takes a bad loss event to reverse its fortunes, but Montpelier Re is in good shape to keep moving pushing its business and its stock price upward.

Bank of America + Apple? This device makes it possible.

Apple recently recruited a secret-development "dream team" to guarantee its newest smart device was kept hidden from the public for as long as possible. But the secret is out , and some early viewers are claiming it's destined to change everything from banking to health care. In fact, ABI Research predicts 485 million of this type of device will be sold per year. But one small company makes Apple's gadget possible. And its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early in-the-know investors. To be one of them, and see Apple's newest smart gizmo, just click here !

The article Montpelier Re Looks to Keep Climbing originally appeared on Fool.com.

Dan Caplinger has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Montpelier Re Holdings. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

Copyright © 1995 - 2015 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

Other Topics

Stocks

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, VA., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world's greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, radio show, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company's name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king -- without getting their heads lopped off.

Learn More