Markets
GM

General Motors' New Cadillac Chief on How Cadillac Will Become a Luxury Leader

Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen unveiled the all-new CTS-V in Detroit last week. The Motley Fool spoke to de Nysschen about the challenges and opportunities facing GM's storied luxury brand. Source: General Motors.

How do you build a luxury brand? How do you turn one that used to be a luxury brand, but fell on hard times, back into a respected luxury brand?

For General Motors , these are $12 billion questions. That's the amount GM's board of directors has committed to an all-out effort to make Cadillac into a global peer -- or maybe even a little more-than-peer -- to the big three German luxury-car makers: BMW , Mercedes-Benz, and Audi.

GM CEO Mary Barra and president Dan Ammann are serious about this effort, so serious they hired a new president for Cadillac and gave him unprecedented freedom within GM's corporate structure. Cadillac chief Johan de Nysschen is a 20-year veteran of Audi and Infiniti, and he has set out to remake Cadillac on the Audi model -- as a subsidiary of GM with its own headquarters, not just a small department within a giant company.

Cadillac's revival has hit the point where the brand has an interesting challenge ahead. While Cadillac's latest products are as good as or better than their German peers, the brand itself doesn't yet have the cachet to draw German-car loyalists into its showrooms.

Having elevated the quality of its cars, how will Cadillac now elevate its brand? That's one of the questions I asked de Nysschen when we spoke at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit last week. In this short video, you'll hear his thoughts on the challenge facing Cadillac, and get some great views of the new ATS-V and some of the other models on Cadillac's show stand.

Check out the video and then scroll down to leave a comment with your thoughts.

Apple Watch revealed: The real winner is inside

Apple recently revealed the product of its secret-development "dream team" -- Apple Watch. The secret is out, and some early viewers are claiming its everyday impact could trump the iPod, iPhone, and the iPad. In fact, ABI Research predicts 485 million of this type of device will be sold per year. But one small company makes Apple's gadget possible. And its stock price could have nearly unlimited room to run for early-in-the-know investors. To be one of them, and see where the opportunity for real money is to be made, just click here !

The article General Motors' New Cadillac Chief on How Cadillac Will Become a Luxury Leader originally appeared on Fool.com.

John Rosevear owns shares of Apple and General Motors. Rex Moore has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Apple and General Motors. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

Copyright © 1995 - 2015 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

In This Story

GM

Other Topics

Stocks

Latest Markets Videos

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, VA., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world's greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, radio show, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company's name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king -- without getting their heads lopped off.

Learn More