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Emerging market workers ready to change jobs, change countries

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Almost two in ten employees would be "very likely" to take a full-time job in another country, according to a recent study from global research company Ipsos. However, Brazilian, Russian and Indian employees scored much higher, and were among the top 5 of the nations surveyed in willingness to move.

Ipsos conducted the study for the Canadian Employee Relocation Council, asking over 10,000 employees in 24 countries if they would take a full-time job in another country for two to three years with a 10% pay increase. Mexican workers were most likely to move, with 34% saying they would be "very likely" to accept. Brazil (32%), Russia (31%), Turkey (31%) and India (28%) rounded out the top 5.

On a global basis, those most likely take the job opportunity were: low income (32%), low education (31%), under the age of 35 (30%), a senior executive/decision maker at their work (29%) and/or men (29%). Many of these traits are typical of of emerging market countries, which are still building up educational systems for their young, growing populations.

Despite the trend of emigrating Chinese millionaires , China scored slightly below average with 18% of workers very likely to move. The United States scored almost at the bottom, with only 9% jumping at international opportunities.

Home has its appeal, especially in a first-world nation with a vibrant economy. But the economic wind has always been at the backs of explorers, colonists, and immigrant workers.

The workers who are ready to move are the ones most likely to discover new economic opportunities, and investors should be on the lookout for large multinational companies -- like the ones in the Dow Jones Industrial Average ETF ( DIA , quote ) -- that are ready to support those workers' ambitions.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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