Nasdaq-Listed Companies

Does Park-Ohio Holdings (NASDAQ:PKOH) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Park-Ohio Holdings Corp. (NASDAQ:PKOH) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

How Much Debt Does Park-Ohio Holdings Carry?

As you can see below, Park-Ohio Holdings had US$515.1m of debt at March 2021, down from US$557.6m a year prior. On the flip side, it has US$58.9m in cash leading to net debt of about US$456.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysisNasdaqGS:PKOH Debt to Equity History June 28th 2021

How Healthy Is Park-Ohio Holdings' Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Park-Ohio Holdings had liabilities of US$319.9m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$639.2m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$58.9m and US$300.7m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total US$599.5m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit casts a shadow over the US$393.6m company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. After all, Park-Ohio Holdings would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Park-Ohio Holdings shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (6.9), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 0.99 times the interest expense. The debt burden here is substantial. Worse, Park-Ohio Holdings's EBIT was down 66% over the last year. If earnings continue to follow that trajectory, paying off that debt load will be harder than convincing us to run a marathon in the rain. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Park-Ohio Holdings's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. In the last three years, Park-Ohio Holdings's free cash flow amounted to 36% of its EBIT, less than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

On the face of it, Park-Ohio Holdings's interest cover left us tentative about the stock, and its EBIT growth rate was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. Having said that, its ability to convert EBIT to free cash flow isn't such a worry. We think the chances that Park-Ohio Holdings has too much debt a very significant. To our minds, that means the stock is rather high risk, and probably one to avoid; but to each their own (investing) style. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 2 warning signs for Park-Ohio Holdings (1 is significant) you should be aware of.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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