Deputy governor says Ukraine central bank reshuffle could hamper IMF deal

Ukrainian central bank deputy governor Dmytro Sologub said on Monday he had opposed a recent reshuffle of responsibilities among senior officials at the central bank, warning it could hamper cooperation with the International Monetary Fund.

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KYIV, Oct 26 (Reuters) - Ukrainian central bank deputy governor Dmytro Sologub said on Monday he had opposed a recent reshuffle of responsibilities among senior officials at the central bank, warning it could hamper cooperation with the International Monetary Fund.

"It was done in a murky and non-transparent way," he wrote on Twitter. "I noted in protocol that it might hamper IMF cooperation," he added.

The central bank last week stripped Deputy Governor Kateryna Rozhkova of her role as the head of banking supervision.

The move was sensitive because Rozhkova played a major role in driving banking reforms that culminated in the 2016 decision to nationalise PrivatBank, the country's largest lender, against the wishes of its main owners.

PrivatBank's future and Ukraine's performance in tackling corruption and implementing reforms are key to the government being able to draw on a $5 billion IMF loan deal to fight a sharp economic slump caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The central bank has defended the decision to move Rozhkova to a new post, saying it was done to meet the needs of its expanded mandate to cover the regulation of the non-bank financial market.

The IMF did not provide immediate comment.

(Reporting by Natalia Zinets; writing by Matthias Williams; Editing by Toby Chopra)

((matthias.williams@thomsonreuters.com;))

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