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China's April soybean imports from Brazil surge from previous month

Credit: REUTERS/CHINA STRINGER NETWORK

China's soybean imports from Brazil surged in April from the previous month, customs data showed on Thursday, as cargoes that had been delayed by poor weather cleared customs.

BEIJING, May 20 (Reuters) - China's soybean imports from Brazil surged in April from the previous month, customs data showed on Thursday, as cargoes that had been delayed by poor weather cleared customs.

China, the world's top importer of soybeans, brought in 5.08 million tonnes of the oilseed from top supplier Brazil in April, up from only 315,334 tonnes in March, data from the General Administration of Customs showed.

But the figure was still below 5.939 million tonnes in the same month last year.

Chinese crushers stepped up purchases of soybeans in expectation of increasing demand for animal feed from the steadily recovering pig sector. Rain, however, delayed the harvest and exports from the South American country.

Brazilian shipments to China in the first quarter plunged from the same period in 2020 as a result, with buyers turning to U.S. soybeans to fill the gap.

China bought 2.15 million tonnes of soybeans from the United States in April, up 223% from 665,591 tonnes a year ago.

(Reporting by Hallie Gu and Shivani Singh; Editing by Kim Coghill)

((Hallie.Gu@thomsonreuters.com; +86 10 56692120; Reuters Messaging: hallie.gu.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net))

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