Barron's Profile of Nasdaq CEO

Writing for Barron's, Alexander Eule provides an insider's view on Nasdaq's CEO, Bob Greifeld 12 year tenure as the leader of the company.

With Nasdaq shares having increased 832% during that time and the company increasingly becoming a high-tech firm, Eule notes that the exchange handles up to 1.65 million messages per second, up from 100,000 in 2003, when Greifeld was appointed Nasdaq's CEO.

Bob Greifeld Barron's Summary Article
In that time, the company has moved from trades executed over the phone to a global fintech company. Noting that with the 2007 merger with OMX, the Nordic exchange, Nasdaq acquired its global scale. Now the company's offices span the globe.

Other growth areas noted during Greifeld's 12 years at the head of Nasdaq include moving from just one market -- U.S. equities; to 25 markets across the world for stocks, derivatives, currencies, commodities, and even private companies. The article notes that Nasdaq’s stock has followed a similar trajectory. Earlier this month, market value crossed $10 billion for the first time with shares up 32% in the past year and 832% since Greifeld’s appointment as CEO.

Barron's profile continues, noting that today's Nasdaq is not the same company it was in 2003. It points out that in 2014, just 27% of revenue came from trading, the rest from recurring business that comes from services businesses in investor and public relations, and market surveillance. In addition, the company's technology powers 75 additional global markets.

Eule's article notes that with NASDAQ Private Market's recent acquisition of SecondMarket Solutions, Greifeld's eye on innovation places Nasdaq in the early stages of a company's formation by providing liquidity events that allow start-up employees and early-stage investors to cash out. This and the other businesses that have grown while Greifeld has been in charge provide Nasdaq customers with continuous services for start-ups, IPOs, and mature public companies -- "a soup-to-nuts approach for capital markets."


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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.