Atlantia reports 1% rise in 9-mth core profit, scraps interim dividend

Credit: REUTERS/ALESSANDRO BIANCHI

Italian infrastructure group Atlantia, which is grappling with the fallout of the deadly collapse of a motorway bridge last year, said on Friday it would not pay an interim dividend on its 2019 results.

MILAN, Nov 8 (Reuters) - Italian infrastructure group Atlantia ATL.MI, which is grappling with the fallout of the deadly collapse of a motorway bridge last year, said on Friday it would not pay an interim dividend on its 2019 results.

The group controlled by the Benetton family said its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) came in at 5.7 billion euros ($6.29 billion) in the first nine months.

Core earnings were in line with the average estimate for five analysts pooled by Reuters.

On a pro-forma basis, excluding the impact coming from the acquisition of Spanish motorway group Abertis last year, Atlantia's core earnings rose 1% year-on-year.

After the bridge disaster, the government has threatened to revoke Atlantia's motorway concession, which accounts for a third of its core profits.

The group is currently in talks with state-owned railways Ferrovie dello Stato for a potential investment in troubled airline Alitalia. An involvement in Alitalia could ease tensions with the government, analysts have said.

($1 = 0.9068 euros)

(Reporting by Francesca Landini)

((francesca.landini@thomsonreuters.com; +39 02 66129437; Reuters Messaging: reutersitaly.thomsonreuters@reuters.net))

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