Personal Finance

5 Ways to Make Your Employees Happier in 2019

Smiling woman in a striped sweater sitting at laptop with a window in the background.

It's no secret that a happy workforce is a loyal, motivated one. If you have reason to believe that your employees aren't all that satisfied with their work experiences, it's critical that you focus on addressing the issue immediately.

With the current strong job market, there's a world of opportunity for your most valued players to take their talents elsewhere if they're not content where they are. Here are a few things that you, as a business owner or manager, can do in the new year to raise your employees' satisfaction quotient and entice them to stay on board.

1. Give them a voice

We all have opinions, ideas, and concerns -- in life and at work. And it's important to make your employees feel like the things they say are taken seriously, whether you're talking about a senior manager or an entry-level administrative assistant. If you send the message that everyone is welcome to share thoughts freely, your workers will feel more valued and respected.

Smiling woman in a striped sweater sitting at laptop with a window in the background.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

2. Be generous with time off

U.S. companies are notoriously stingy when it comes to paid time off -- so much so that 73% of workers would welcome more time off over a holiday bonus, according to LinkedIn . By giving employees ample opportunity to recharge, pursue hobbies, and take care of life's many obligations, you'll make their jobs less stressful in the process.

3. Offer some scheduling leeway

An estimated 70% of U.S. employees are dissatisfied with their work-life balance, according to FlexJobs . If you want your workers' outlooks to improve, think about the different ways you can offer them more flexibility on an ongoing basis.

This could involve letting them set their own working hours (within reason) or allowing those whose jobs can be done remotely to work from home. Extending that courtesy shows that you respect and acknowledge the fact that your employees have lives outside the office, and if you give them enough leeway, they'll not only grow more content, but most likely return the favor by being flexible when you need it.

4. Be more available

If you own or manage a business, your days are probably jampacked with more tasks and meetings than you can count. And while you can't necessarily take the time to sit down with each of your employees on a daily basis, you should make a point of being available when workers are struggling or encounter pressing issues that warrant your attention. To that end, encourage employees to reach out and ask for guidance, as needed, so they don't feel like they have to handle their challenges alone.

5. Foster career development

Nobody wants to feel stuck in a dead-end job . If you want your employees to feel better about coming to work, give them something to look forward to. Allow lower-level employees to shadow higher-ups to learn the ropes and dabble in new things. When possible, give your workers time off for professional development, whether in the form of taking classes or attending industry conferences. If you show your workers that you're looking to help them grow, they might get more excited about the potential your company has to offer.

Happy employees tend to be loyal employees. If you want to retain your staff in the coming year, focus on making their work experiences more satisfying. It's certainly a worthwhile investment.

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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