Markets

4 Ways You’re Holding Yourself Back From Getting Promoted

There will probably come a point in your career when you're tired of being stuck in the same role and start vying for a promotion. Now to successfully climb the ranks, you may need to boost your skills, take on more responsibility, or do something else to prove to your manager that you're capable of reaching that next level. And if you're not careful, you could end up thwarting your efforts to get promoted, thereby creating a scenario where you're bored and frustrated. Here are a few ways you may be sabotaging your chances at a promotion -- and what to do about them.

1. Not displaying enough confidence

Sometimes, getting promoted boils down to having the right attitude. If you present yourself as a confident person, your manager is more likely to have faith in you, so check your timid sentiments at the door and instead start acting like the capable person you are. When you get up to present at meetings, own the room. When you have suggestions to run by your boss, don't qualify them with "I'm sorry to disagree, but..." Instead, make it clear that you know what you're doing and should therefore be trusted to do more.

Man in suit holding his head while seated in front of documents

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

2. Not stepping outside your comfort zone

It's one thing to volunteer for new projects that align with the work you do all the time, but it's another thing to step up and take on initiatives no one on your team has tackled before. It's the latter that's more likely to land you a promotion, so don't balk at the idea of trying something completely out of the box or outside your realm of expertise. If you make it clear that you're not afraid to experiment or be vulnerable, your boss might choose you for the next promotion that opens up.

3. Not networking

Your boss may not be your only ticket to a promotion, and if you don't network internally, you could lose out on key opportunities. Talk to different managers within your company, and get to know people in different departments, even if they're not ones you work with. You may find that when an opening pops up elsewhere, your name comes to the right person's mind.

4. Not asking

Getting promoted often means taking on more of a workload and facing additional pressure. And that's the sort of thing that may not appeal to everyone. As such, your boss may not be so quick to promote you in an effort to spare you that fate, so if you're keen on a title change despite the negatives involved, make that abundantly clear. Sometimes, the simple act of asking for what you want is enough to help you get it.

The last thing you want to do is inadvertently prevent yourself from getting promoted. Take the time to examine your attitude and behavior at work, and make changes if you're guilty of any of the above. A little self-assessment could set the stage for a positive career shift, and the job-related satisfaction that comes with it.

The $16,728 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook
If you're like most Americans, you're a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known "Social Security secrets" could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,728 more... each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we're all after. Simply click here to discover how to learn more about these strategies.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

Latest Markets Videos

The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, VA., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building the world's greatest investment community. Reaching millions of people each month through its website, books, newspaper column, radio show, television appearances, and subscription newsletter services, The Motley Fool champions shareholder values and advocates tirelessly for the individual investor. The company's name was taken from Shakespeare, whose wise fools both instructed and amused, and could speak the truth to the king -- without getting their heads lopped off.

Learn More