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3 Reasons Dollar General Corp.'s Stock Could Fall

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3. Room at the top

With CEO Rick Dreiling stepping down and CFO David Tehle retiring, Dollar General has a brain drain in the C-suite that will have its replacements needing to take the reins just as the deep discounter is attempting to transition to a new, more competitive marketplace. The loss of these two executives, who have maneuvered Dollar General through its successful return to the public markets, comes at an awkward time.

The deep-discount retailer isn't floundering by any means, but asking new leadership to take over just as its rivals are going on the offensive -- and as Dollar General needs to outperform to finance new goals -- is a tall order.

A steady focus on growth

Again, Dollar General isn't a company in distress, and the concerns highlighted above can work themselves out to its benefit. In fact, they could end up powering the deep discounter to even greater heights if they fall into place. But the market always seem to have a way of disrupting the best-laid plans, and investors would do well to remain aware that there will most likely be stumbles in the future -- missteps that could send the company's stock lower.

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The article 3 Reasons Dollar General Corp.'s Stock Could Fall originally appeared on Fool.com.

FollowRich Duprey 's coverage of all theretailing industry'smost important news and developments. He has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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