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2011: A year marked by the deaths of Osama bin Laden, Kim Jong-Il and Terrible Movies

While 2011 will likely be remembered for the assassinations of Osama bin Laden and Muammar el-Qaddafi and the death of Kim Jong-Il, it is also worth noting that a majority of the films released also stunk.

Big time.

It is worth noting that not every movie was terrible, but Hollywood has some serious thinking to do after a disappointing annual box office. With only a few days left before 2011 becomes 2012 and those diets begin - You can do it! - North America ticket sales are approximately half a billion dollars behind last year's levels.

Nonetheless, much like a sin curve, movie ticket sales ebb and flow. And even though at first glance $500 million may seem substantial, in the context of the $10.1 billion that analysts project total North American sales will reach this year, the figure seems rather paltry. That, at least, is how some studio executives are downplaying lackluster numbers.

Discerning moviegoers, however, should not buy such an explanation. With the myriad sequels, 3-D movies and just plain terrible films released this year, it is no wonder why ticket sales are down.

Moreover, with the economic climate remaining stubbornly tepid, people have better ways to spend their money than on movies, even on ones with such enticing titles such as "The Thing," "Fright Night" and "Prom."

Hollywood is hoping for a comeback in 2012, and based on the trailer for the latest Batman move, " The Dark Knight Rises ," it has a chance. Still, if movie studios hope to spur more people to spend their hard-earned cash, they should stop making movies devoid of character development, logical plots and good acting.

Then again, " Transformers: Dark of the Moon " made more than $1.1 billion internationally, underscoring how "logic" and "character development" are, perhaps, of a bygone era.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.