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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 2, 2012

Registration No. 333-175616

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

Amendment No. 4 to

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware    5812    35-2382255

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

  

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

   (I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

 

 

2481 Mañana Drive

Dallas, Texas 75220

(214) 357-9588

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

Stephen M. King

Chief Executive Officer

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc.

2481 Mañana Drive

Dallas, Texas 75220

(214) 357-9588

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

 

Copies to:

 

Corey R. Chivers, Esq.

Alexander D. Lynch, Esq.

Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

767 Fifth Avenue

New York, New York 10153

(212) 310-8000 (Phone)

(212) 310-8007 (Fax)

 

D. Rhett Brandon, Esq.

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP

425 Lexington Avenue

New York, New York 10017

(212) 455-2000 (Phone)

(212) 455-2502 (Fax)

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:

As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.   ¨

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.   ¨

If this Form is a post effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.   ¨

If this Form is a post effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

  Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   ¨   Non-accelerated filer   x   Smaller reporting company   ¨

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of
Securities to be Registered
  Proposed
Maximum
Aggregate
Offering Price (1)(2)
  Amount of
Registration Fee

Common Stock, $0.01 par value

  $150,000,000   $17,415 (3)

 

 

(1) Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee in accordance with Rule 457(o) promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933.
(2) Includes shares of common stock that may be purchased by the underwriters under their option to purchase additional shares of common stock, if any.
(3) Previously paid.

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. These securities may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell nor does it seek an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Subject to Completion. Dated May 2, 2012.

Prospectus

             Shares

 

LOGO

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc.

Common Stock

 

 

This is an initial public offering of shares of common stock by Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. is selling            shares of common stock.

Prior to this offering there has been no public market for our common stock. The initial public offering price is expected to be between $             and $             per share. We intend to apply to list our common stock on either the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) or The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (NASDAQ) under the symbol “PLAY.”

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. is an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”).

 

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “ Risk Factors ” beginning on page 17.

 

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any other regulatory body has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

     Per Share      Total  

Initial public offering price

   $                    $                

Underwriting discounts and commissions

   $         $     

Proceeds to us, before expenses

   $         $     

The underwriters may also purchase up to an additional            shares from the selling stockholders on a pro rata basis at the public offering price, less the underwriting discount, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus. Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. will not receive any of the proceeds from the shares of common stock sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to any exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares.

The shares will be ready for delivery on or about                      , 2012.

 

Goldman, Sachs & Co.   Jefferies   Piper Jaffray
Raymond James     RBC Capital Markets

 

 

Prospectus dated                    , 2012.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

Prospectus Summary

     1   

Risk Factors

     17   

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

     34   

Use of Proceeds

     36   

Dividend Policy

     37   

Capitalization

     38   

Dilution

     39   

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

     41   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     44   

Business

     74   

Management

     88   

Executive Compensation

     95   

Principal Stockholders

     106   

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

     108   

Description of Capital Stock

     111   

Shares Eligible for Future Sale

     116   

Certain Material United States Federal Income and Estate Tax Considerations

     118   

Underwriting

     122   

Legal Matters

     126   

Experts

     126   

Available Information

     126   

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

     F-1   

 

 

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. We have not, and the underwriters have not, authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. We are not, and the underwriters are not, making an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus is only accurate as of the date on the front cover of this prospectus. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date.

 

 

No dealer, salesperson or other person is authorized to give any information or to represent anything not contained in this prospectus. You must not rely on any unauthorized information or representations. This prospectus is an offer to sell only the shares offered hereby, but only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. The information contained in this prospectus is current only as of its date.

 

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PRESENTATION OF STORE LEVEL AND GUEST INFORMATION

Comparable store data presented in this prospectus relate to stores open at least 18 months as of the beginning of each of the relevant fiscal periods and excludes information for our one franchised store located in Canada. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

This prospectus also contains information regarding guest feedback, guest satisfaction, guest demographics and other similar items. This information is based upon data collected by us during the periods presented. This information is reported voluntarily by our guests and thus represents responses from only a portion of the total number of our guests. We have not independently verified any of the demographic information collected from our guests. Over the periods presented, we have changed the form of reward for completing a survey, which resulted in an increase in the percentage of completed surveys, but we do not believe this has materially impacted the results. In addition, over the periods presented, we have added and deleted questions from the questionnaires, but have not made any changes to questions eliciting responses relating to the results presented in the prospectus. We use the information collected as one measure of the performance of our stores and use it to assess the success of our initiatives to improve the quality of the product we offer.

TRADEMARKS, SERVICE MARKS AND TRADE NAMES

We own or have rights to use the trademarks, service marks and trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our businesses. Our registered trademarks include Dave & Buster’s ® , Power Card ® , Eat Drink Play ® and Eat & Play Combo ® . Other trademarks, service marks and trade names used in this prospectus are the property of their respective owners.

Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this prospectus are listed without the ® and symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights (or the rights of the applicable licensors) to these trademarks, service marks and trade names.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and may not contain all of the information that may be important to you. Before making an investment decision, you should read this entire prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere herein. You should also carefully consider the information set forth under “Risk Factors.” In addition, certain statements include forward-looking information that is subject to risks and uncertainties. See “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” In this prospectus, unless the context otherwise requires, “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company” and “Dave & Buster’s” refers to Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc., its subsidiaries, and any predecessor companies, collectively.

Certain financial measures presented in this prospectus, such as Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Store-level EBITDA and Store-level EBITDA margin, are not recognized terms under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). These measures exclude a number of significant items, including our interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense. For a discussion of the use of these measures and a reconciliation to the most directly comparable GAAP measures, see pages 12-16,“—Summary Historical Financial and Other Data.” We define high-volume dining and entertainment venues as those open for at least one full year and with average store revenues in excess of $5.0 million and define year one cash-on-cash return as year one Store-level EBITDA exclusive of national marketing costs divided by net development costs.

Our fiscal year ends on the Sunday after the Saturday closest to January 31. All references to fiscal 2011 relate to the fifty-two weeks ended January 29, 2012 of the Successor. All references to fiscal 2010 relate to the combined 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 of the Successor and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 of the Predecessor. All references to fiscal 2009 relate to the fifty-two weeks ended January 31, 2010 of the Predecessor. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year.

Company Overview

We are a leading owner and operator of high-volume venues that combine dining and entertainment in North America for both adults and families. Founded in 1982, the core of our concept is to offer our guests the opportunity to “ Eat Drink Play ” all in one location. We believe we are currently the largest national chain offering a full menu of casual dining food items and a full selection of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverage items together with an extensive assortment of entertainment attractions, including skill and sports-oriented redemption games, video games, interactive simulators and other traditional games. Unlike the strategy of many restaurants of shortening visit times by focusing on turning tables faster, we aim to increase the length of stay in our locations to generate incremental revenues and improve the guest’s experience. While our guests are primarily a balanced mix of men and women aged 21 to 39, we believe we are also an attractive venue for families with children and teenagers. As of April 15, 2012, we owned and operated 59 stores in 25 states and Canada. In addition, there is one franchised store operating in Canada. The formats of our stores are flexible, which we believe allows us to size each store appropriately for each market in which we compete. Our stores average approximately 47,000 square feet, range in size between 16,000 and 66,000 square feet and are open seven days a week. For fiscal 2011, we generated total revenues, Adjusted EBITDA and net loss of $541.5 million, $98.4 million and $7.0 million, respectively. For fiscal 2010 (combined), we generated total revenues, Adjusted EBITDA and net loss of $521.5 million, $86.3 million and $7.3 million, respectively.

 

 

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We believe we have an attractive store economic model that enables us to generate what we believe to be high average store revenues and Store-level EBITDA. For comparable stores in fiscal 2011, our average revenues per store were $9.8 million, average Store-level EBITDA was $2.3 million and average Store-level EBITDA margin was 24%. Furthermore, for that same period, all of our Dave & Buster’s comparable stores had positive Store-level EBITDA, with over 85% of our stores generating more than $1.0 million of Store-level EBITDA each. After allocating corporate general and administrative expenses, our Adjusted EBITDA margin was 18.2% for fiscal 2011. Store-level and Adjusted EBITDA exclude a number of significant items, including our interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense. A key feature of our business model is that approximately 50% of our total revenues for fiscal 2011 were from our entertainment offerings, which have a relatively low variable cost component (consisting primarily of “Winner’s Circle” redemption items) and contributed a gross margin of 85% for the period.

Since being taken private in 2006 when our current management team joined the Company, we have implemented a series of operating and strategic initiatives that we believe have streamlined our operations and reduced costs. The operating initiatives undertaken by our management team include, among others, the implementation of new ordering technology and labor scheduling to drive productivity, the introduction of automated kiosks and related pricing strategies to reduce labor costs and increase revenues on each Power Card sold and centralization or restructuring of certain functions resulting in an overall reduction in staffing levels. We believe that the lower variable costs (such as the cost of products associated with our entertainment revenues) in our business model, effective management of our corporate cost structure and national marketing expenditures create operating leverage in our business, which we believe will allow us to increase revenues within our existing operations without a proportional increase in costs. As a result, we believe we have the potential to improve margins and deliver increased earnings from any growth in comparable store sales, although there can be no guarantee that we will do so and we have experienced net losses in the fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009 periods. While we have implemented initiatives focused on our cost structure, we have simultaneously increased our guest satisfaction in both food and entertainment, based on the results of our periodic Guest Satisfaction Survey.

Our management team has also refined our large store format and developed a new small store format, which we believe will allow us to increase the number of markets in which we can grow. Both of our new store formats are smaller and less expensive to build, which we believe will help us to achieve our targeted cash-on-cash returns. With respect to stores we expect to open in the near term, we are targeting a year one cash-on-cash return of 25% to 35% for both our large format and small format store openings, and, since the beginning of 2008, our eight store openings (that have been open for more than 12 months) have generated average year one cash-on-cash returns of 29.4%.

Eat Drink Play —The Core of Our National Concept

When our founders opened our first location in Dallas, Texas in 1982, they sought to create a dining concept with a fun, upbeat atmosphere providing interactive entertainment options for adults and families, while serving high-quality food and beverages. Since then we have followed the same principle for each new store, and in doing so we believe we have developed a distinctive brand based on our guest value proposition: Eat Drink Play . The interplay between entertainment, dining and full-service bar areas is the defining feature of the Dave & Buster’s guest experience, and the layout of each store is designed to promote crossover between these activities. We believe this combination creates an experience that cannot be easily replicated at home or elsewhere without having to visit multiple destinations. Our locations are also designed to accommodate private parties, business functions and other corporate sponsored events.

 

 

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We seek to distinguish our food menu from other casual dining concepts. Our recently reengineered menu includes items that we believe reinforce the fun of the Dave & Buster’s brand. Recent additions to the menu have become top sellers within their categories. We believe we offer high-quality meals, including gourmet pastas, choice-grade steaks, premium sandwiches, decadent desserts and health-conscious entrée options that compare favorably to those of other higher end casual dining operators. Each of our locations also offers full bar service including a variety of beers, signature cocktails, premium spirits and nonalcoholic beverages. Food and beverage accounted for approximately 50% of our total revenues during fiscal 2011.

The “Midway” in each of our stores is an area where we offer a wide array of amusements and entertainment options, with typically over 150 redemption and simulation games. We believe the entertainment options in our Midway are a core differentiating feature of our brand, and our amusement and other revenues accounted for approximately 50% of our total revenues during fiscal 2011. Redemption games, which represented 79% of our amusement and other revenues in fiscal 2011, offer our guests the opportunity to win tickets that are redeemable at our “Winner’s Circle” for prizes ranging from branded novelty items to high-end home electronics. We believe this “opportunity to win” creates a fun and highly energized social experience that is an important aspect of the Dave & Buster’s in-store experience and cannot be replicated at home. Our video and simulation games, many of which can be played by multiple guests simultaneously and which include some of the latest high-tech games commercially available, represented 18% of our amusement and other revenues in fiscal 2011. Traditional amusements, which include billiards, bowling and shuffleboard tables, represented the remainder of our amusement and other revenues. Each of our stores also contains multiple large screen televisions and high quality audio systems providing guests with a venue for watching live sports and other televised events.

Our Company’s Core Strengths

We believe we benefit from the following strengths:

Strong, distinctive brand with broad guest appeal .     We believe that the multi-faceted guest experience of Eat Drink Play at Dave & Buster’s, supported by our marketing campaigns as well as our 29 year history, have helped us create a widely recognized brand with no direct national competitor that combines all three elements in the same way. This is evidenced by our brand’s consumer awareness of over 90% in our existing trade areas. Our brand’s connection with its guests is evidenced by our guest loyalty program that, as of April 2012, had over 2.0 million members, which represents an increase of 43% since March 2011. Our guest research shows that our brand appeals to a balanced mix of male and female adults, primarily between the ages of 21 and 39, as well as families and teenagers. Based on guest survey results, we also believe that the average household income of our guests is approximately $70,000, which we believe is representative of an attractive demographic.

Multi-faceted guest experience and our value proposition .     We believe that our combination of interactive entertainment, high-quality dining and full-service beverage offerings, delivered in a highly-energized atmosphere that caters to both adults and families, provides a multi-faceted guest experience that cannot be replicated at home or elsewhere without having to visit multiple destinations. We also believe that the cost of visiting a Dave & Buster’s offers a value proposition for our guests comparable or superior to many of the separately available dining and entertainment options.

Store economic model capable of delivering diversified cash flows and strong cash-on-cash returns.     We believe our store economic model provides certain benefits in comparison to traditional restaurant concepts, which we believe helps increase our average store revenues and

 

 

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Store-level EBITDA. Our entertainment offerings have low variable costs and produced gross margins of 85% for fiscal 2011. With approximately half of our revenues from entertainment, we believe we have less exposure than traditional restaurant concepts to food costs, which represented only 9% of our revenues in fiscal 2011. We believe that the low variable cost of our business model, our national marketing expenditures and effective management of our current corporate cost structure, which we believe has benefited from the operating initiatives implemented by management in recent years, creates operating leverage in our business. As a result, we believe we have the potential to further improve margins and deliver greater earnings from any increases in comparable store sales. For example, with comparable store sales growth of 2.2% in fiscal 2011 over fiscal 2010, our operating income and operating income margin increased by 55.1% and 209 basis points, respectively. Similarly, our Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin increased by 14.0% and 163 basis points, respectively. We believe the combination of our improved store-level margins and our refined new store formats, which are less expensive to build, will help us achieve our targeted year one cash-on-cash returns of 25% to 35% for both our large format and small format store openings, although there is no guarantee such results will occur. Since the beginning of fiscal 2008, our eight store openings (that have been open for more than 12 months) have generated average year one cash-on-cash returns of 29.4%. We define strong cash-on-cash returns as those greater than 20%.

History of product innovation and marketing initiatives.     We have a history of implementing what we consider to be innovative marketing initiatives, including our Eat & Play Combo, higher Power Card denominations, Super Charge up-sell and Half-Price Game Play on Wednesdays, which we believe have helped increase guest visits while encouraging them to participate more fully across our range of food, beverage and entertainment offerings. We are continuously working with game manufacturers and food providers to create new games and food items to retain and generate guest traffic. We also take advantage of our proprietary technology linking games with Power Cards to change prices and offer promotions to increase the overall performance of our stores and to increase the efficiency of the Midway.

Commitment to guest satisfaction.     While we have been focused on margin enhancing initiatives, we have simultaneously improved our guest satisfaction levels. Through the implementation of guest feedback tools throughout the organization, including a periodic Guest Satisfaction Survey and Quarterly Brand Health Study, we collect information from our guests that helps us to improve and enhance the overall guest experience. We have identified several key drivers of guest satisfaction, and have initiated programs to improve focus on these drivers while improving our cost structure. The percentage of guest survey respondents rating us “Top Box” in our Guest Satisfaction Survey has improved significantly over the past several years. Between fiscal 2007 when the surveys began and fiscal 2011, the number of guests responding “Very Likely” on “Intent to Recommend to a Friend, Relative or Colleague” increased from 64.8% to 81.6%. The number of guests responding “Excellent” on “Food Quality” increased from 37.9% to 74.8%. Most importantly, the percentage of “Excellent” scores for “Overall Experience” increased from 44.0% to 77.6% over the same period. The Guest Satisfaction Survey information is reported voluntarily by our guests, and we encourage participation in our feedback tools through promotional offers. In early 2010, we changed the form of reward for completing the survey, which resulted in an increase in the percentage of completed surveys, but we do not believe has materially impacted the results.

Experienced management team.     We believe we are led by a strong management team with extensive experience with national brands in all aspects of casual dining and entertainment operations. In 2006, we hired our Chief Executive Officer, Stephen King. From fiscal 2006 to fiscal 2011, under the leadership of Mr. King, Adjusted EBITDA has grown by over 39%, Adjusted EBITDA margins have

 

 

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increased by approximately 436 basis points and employee turnover and guest satisfaction metrics have improved significantly. Our management team has invested approximately $4.2 million of cash in the equity of Dave & Buster’s and currently owns 10.6% of the equity on a fully diluted basis. We believe that our management team’s prior experience in the restaurant and entertainment industries combined with its experience at Dave & Buster’s in recent years provides us with insights into our guest base and enables us to create the dynamic environment that is core to our brand.

Our Growth Strategies

The operating strategy that underlies the growth of our concept is built on the following key components:

Pursue disciplined new store growth.     We will continue to pursue what we believe to be a disciplined new store growth strategy in both new and existing markets where we believe we are capable of achieving consistent high store revenues and strong store-level cash-on-cash returns. We have created a new store expansion strategy and rebuilt our pipeline of potential new stores by instituting a site selection process that allows us to evaluate and select our new store location, size and design based on consumer research and analysis of operating data from sales in our existing stores. Where permitted, we also collect home zip code information from our guests on a voluntary basis through the Power Card kiosks in our existing stores, which allows us to determine how far they have traveled to reach that particular store. Our site selection process and flexible store design enable us to customize each store with the objective of maximizing return on capital given the characteristics of the market and location. We expect our new large format stores to be approximately 35,000 – 40,000 square feet and our small format stores to be approximately 22,000 – 25,000 square feet, which provides us the flexibility to enter new smaller markets and further penetrate existing markets. These formats also provide us the flexibility to choose between building new stores or converting existing space. With respect to stores we expect to open in the near term, we are targeting a year one cash-on-cash return of 25% to 35% for both our large format and small format store openings, levels that are consistent with the average of Dave & Buster’s store openings in recent years. To achieve this return we target a ratio of first year store revenues to net development costs of approximately one-to-one and Store-level EBITDA margins, excluding national marketing costs, of 27% to 30%. We also target average net development costs of approximately $10.3 million for large format stores and approximately $6.3 million for small format stores.

We believe the Dave & Buster’s brand is significantly under-penetrated, with internal studies and third-party research suggesting a total store universe in the United States and Canada in excess of 150 stores (including our 59 existing company-owned stores), approximately two and a half times our current store base. We currently plan to open four stores in fiscal 2012 (including our store in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma that opened on January 30, 2012) and four to six stores in fiscal 2013, which we expect will be financed with available cash and operating cash flows. Thereafter, we believe we can continue opening new stores at an annual rate of approximately 10% of our then existing store base. Our ability to open new stores in the future is subject to the availability of sufficient cash flows and financing, as well as other factors, and therefore there is no guarantee we will open new stores at this rate.

Grow our comparable store sales .     We intend to grow our comparable store sales by seeking to differentiate the Dave & Buster’s brand from other food and entertainment alternatives, through the following strategies:

 

  Ÿ  

Enhance our food and beverage offerings:     We frequently test new menu items and seek to improve our food offering to better align with the Dave & Buster’s brand. To further reinforce the fun of our brand, our new menu includes familiar food items served in presentations that we

 

 

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view as distinctive and appealing to our guests. In 2011, we developed and tested new presentations for every item on the menu, featuring new plateware and glassware. We saw a significant increase in quality perceptions among our guests during the test and will introduce these new presentations to all our stores in fiscal 2012.

 

  Ÿ  

Maintain the latest exciting entertainment options:     We believe that our entertainment options are the core differentiating feature of the Dave & Buster’s brand, and staying current with the latest offerings creates excitement and helps drive repeat visits and increase length of guest stay. In fiscal 2012, we expect to spend an average of one hundred seventy thousand dollars per store on game refreshment, which we believe will drive brand relevance and comparable store sales growth. Further, we intend to upgrade viewing areas by introducing televisions in excess of 100 inches in stores within key markets in order to capture a higher share of the sports-viewing guest base. We also plan to elevate the redemption experience in our “Winner’s Circle” with prizes that we believe guests will find more attractive, which we expect will favorably impact guest visitation and game play.

 

  Ÿ  

Enhance brand awareness and generate additional visits to our stores through marketing and promotions:     To further national awareness of our brand, we plan to continue to invest a significant portion of our marketing expenditures in television advertising. We have recently launched customized local store marketing programs to increase new visits and repeat visits to individual locations. Our guest loyalty program currently has over 2.0 million members, and we are aggressively improving our search engine and social marketing efforts. Our loyalty program and digital efforts allow us to communicate promotional offers directly to our most passionate brand fans. We also leverage our investments in technology across our marketing platform, including in-store marketing initiatives to drive incremental sales throughout the store.

 

  Ÿ  

Grow our special events usage:     We plan to utilize existing and add new resources to our special events sales force as the corporate special events market improves—the special events portion of our business represented 13% of our total revenues in fiscal 2011. We believe our special events business is an important sampling and promotional opportunity for our guests because many guests are experiencing Dave & Buster’s for the first time.

Continue to enhance margins.     We believe we are well-positioned to continue to increase margins and have additional opportunities to reduce costs. Based on the operating leverage generated by our business model as described above, which we believe has benefited from the operating initiatives implemented by management in recent years and our national marketing expenditures, we believe we have the potential to further improve margins and deliver greater earnings from expected future increases in comparable store sales. Under our current cost structure, we estimate that more than 50% of any comparable store sales growth would flow through to our Adjusted EBITDA. We also believe that improved labor scheduling technology will allow us to further increase labor productivity in the future. Our continued focus on operating margins at individual locations and the deployment of best practices across our store base is expected to yield incremental margin improvements, although there is no guarantee that we will be able to achieve greater margins or greater earnings in the future.

Use of Proceeds

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering to reduce our aggregate indebtedness by approximately $             million, as well as to pay related premiums, interest and expenses. After applying the proceeds from this offering, our aggregate indebtedness will be approximately $             million on an as adjusted basis as of January 29, 2012. See “ Use of Proceeds ” and “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources.

 

 

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Corporate History

We opened our first store in Dallas, Texas in 1982 and since then we have expanded our portfolio nationally to 59 company-owned stores across 25 states and Canada.

From 1997 to early 2006, we operated as a public company under the leadership of our founders, David “Dave” Corriveau and James “Buster” Corley. In March 2006, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. was acquired by Dave & Buster’s Holdings, Inc. (“D&B Holdings”), a holding company controlled by affiliates of Wellspring Capital Partners III, L.P. (“Wellspring”) and HBK Main Street Investors L.P. (“HBK”). In connection with the acquisition of Dave & Buster’s by Wellspring and HBK, Dave & Buster’s common stock was delisted from the New York Stock Exchange. In addition, in 2006, we hired our current management team led by our Chief Executive Officer, Stephen King.

On June 1, 2010, Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. (formerly known as Dave & Buster’s Parent, Inc. and originally named Games Acquisition Corp.), a newly-formed Delaware corporation owned by Oak Hill Capital Partners III, L.P. and Oak Hill Capital Management Partners III, L.P. (collectively, the “Oak Hill Funds” and together with their manager, Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC, and its related funds, “Oak Hill Capital Partners”) acquired all of the outstanding common stock (the “Acquisition”) of D&B Holdings from Wellspring and HBK. In connection therewith, Games Merger Corp., a newly-formed Missouri corporation and an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc., merged (the “Merger”) with and into D&B Holdings’ wholly-owned, direct subsidiary, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. (with Dave & Buster’s, Inc. being the surviving corporation in the Merger). In applying purchase price accounting from the Acquisition, based on internal and external fair value assessments, an aggregate $267.5 million increase in the carrying value of our long-lived assets was recognized, including a $222.5 million increase in indefinite-lived assets not subject to amortization, a $29.1 million increase in assets that have annual depreciation expense recognized and a $15.9 million increase in other amortizing long-lived assets. As a result of the Acquisition and certain post-acquisition activity, the Oak Hill Funds directly control approximately 95.4% of our outstanding common stock and have the right to appoint certain members of our Board of Directors, and certain members of our Board of Directors and management control approximately 4.6% of our outstanding common stock. Upon completion of this offering, the Oak Hill Funds will beneficially own approximately     % of our outstanding common stock, or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management will beneficially own approximately     % of our common stock or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full. The Oak Hill Funds and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management who are party to a stockholders agreement will continue to own a majority of the voting power of our outstanding common stock. As a result, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of the NYSE and NASDAQ. See “Principal Stockholders.”

 

 

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Index to Financial Statements

Ownership Structure

The following chart gives effect to our ownership structure after giving effect to this offering(1):

 

LOGO

 

 

(1) Assumes an offering at a price per share of $            , the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus, and excludes the exercise of the option to purchase additional shares.

Oak Hill Capital Partners

Oak Hill Capital Partners is a private equity firm with committed capital from leading entrepreneurs, endowments, foundations, corporations, pension funds and global financial institutions. The funds managed by Oak Hill Capital Partners were formed with over $8 billion of initial capital commitments. Over 25 years, the professionals at Oak Hill Capital Partners and its predecessors have invested in more than 70 significant private equity transactions across broad segments of the U.S. and global economies. Oak Hill Capital Partners applies a theme-based approach to investing across six key industry sectors (Basic Industries, Business and Financial Services, Consumer, Retail and Distribution, Healthcare, Media and Telecommunications, and Technology). Dave & Buster’s represents a core investment theme of the firm’s Consumer, Retail and Distribution team, which has experience investing in the restaurant and specialty retail sectors. Oak Hill Capital Partners is one of several independently managed firms (which may work together from time to time) operating with the Oak Hill name and investing in various asset classes, including equity and debt securities.

After completion of this offering, the Oak Hill Funds and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management who are party to a stockholders’ agreement will continue to own a majority of the voting power of our outstanding common stock. The parties will also enter into an

 

 

8


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Index to Financial Statements

amended and restated stockholders’ agreement in connection with this offering. See “Principal Stockholders.” As a result, the Oak Hill Funds and these parties will hold the power to elect a majority of the seats on our Board of Directors and will have certain designation and nomination rights upon the completion of this offering. The Oak Hill Funds will be entitled to designate directors to serve on the Board of Directors proportionate to the Oak Hill Funds’ (or one or more of their affiliates) aggregate ownership of the outstanding shares of our common stock, at any meeting of stockholders at which directors are to be elected to the extent that the Oak Hill Funds do not have such proportionate number of director designees then serving on the Board of Directors; provided that for so long as the Oak Hill Funds (or one or more of their affiliates), individually or in the aggregate, own 5% or more of the voting power of the outstanding shares of our common stock, the Oak Hill Funds will be entitled to designate one director designee to serve on the Board of Directors at any meeting of stockholders at which directors are to be elected to the extent that the Oak Hill Funds do not have a director designee then serving on the Board of Directors. The amended and restated stockholders’ agreement will also provide that the Oak Hill Funds will be entitled to nominate the members of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. When conflicts arise between the interests of the Oak Hill Funds or their affiliates and the interests of our stockholders, these directors may not be disinterested. The representatives of the Oak Hill Funds on our Board of Directors, by the terms of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, are not required to offer us any transaction opportunity of which they become aware and could take any such opportunity for themselves or offer it to other companies in which they have an investment, unless such opportunity is expressly offered to them solely in their capacity as our directors (and therefore may be free to compete with us in the same business or similar business). See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions—Amended and restated stockholders’ agreement” and “Risk Factors—Conflicts of interest may arise because some of our directors are principals of our principal stockholder.”

Corporate Information

Our corporate headquarters is located at 2481 Mañana Drive, Dallas, Texas, and our telephone number is (214) 357-9588. Our website is www.daveandbusters.com. Information contained on our website does not constitute a part of this prospectus.

 

 

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The Offering

 

Shares of Common Stock Offered by us

 

             shares.

Shares of Common Stock to be Outstanding After This Offering

 

             shares.

Option to Purchase Additional Shares

  The underwriters have an option to purchase a maximum of              additional shares of our common stock from the selling stockholders on a pro rata basis. The underwriters can exercise this option at any time within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.

Use of Proceeds

  We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses, will be approximately $            million, assuming the shares are offered at $            (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus). We intend to use these net proceeds to pay down a portion of our existing indebtedness, which may include the existing discount notes, the existing senior notes and the term loan portion of our senior secured credit facility and to pay fees and expenses associated with the offering. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling stockholders if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares. See “ Use of Proceeds .”

Dividend Policy

  We do not anticipate paying any dividends on our common stock, however, we may change this policy in the future. See “ Dividend Policy .”

Proposed NYSE or NASDAQ Symbol

  “PLAY”

Risk Factors

  You should carefully read and consider the information set forth under “Risk Factors” beginning on page 17 of this prospectus and all other information set forth in this prospectus before investing in our common stock.

Unless otherwise indicated, the number of shares of common stock to be outstanding after this offering:

 

  Ÿ  

excludes              shares of our common stock issuable upon exercise of stock options and shares of our common stock to be reserved for future grants under our Dave & Buster’s Parent, Inc. 2010 Management Incentive Plan (the “Stock Incentive Plan”).

 

 

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Index to Financial Statements

Unless otherwise noted, the information in this prospectus:

 

  Ÿ  

gives effect to a             for 1 stock split of our common stock prior to the consummation of this offering;

 

  Ÿ  

gives effect to our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, which will be in effect prior to the consummation of this offering;

 

  Ÿ  

assumes no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase up to            additional shares from the selling stockholders; and

 

  Ÿ  

assumes an initial public offering price of $             per share, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus.

Risks Associated With Our Business

Our business is subject to numerous risks, which are highlighted in the section entitled “ Risk Factors .” These risks represent challenges to the successful implementation of our strategy and the growth of our business. Some of these risks are:

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to open new stores and operate them profitably;

 

  Ÿ  

changes in discretionary spending by consumers and general economic conditions;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to compete favorably in the out-of-home and home-based entertainment and restaurant markets;

 

  Ÿ  

unauthorized use of our intellectual property;

 

  Ÿ  

damage to our brand or reputation;

 

  Ÿ  

failure or destruction of our information systems and other technology that support our business;

 

  Ÿ  

seasonality of our business and the timing of new openings and other events; and

 

  Ÿ  

availability and cost of food and other supplies.

For a discussion of these and other risks you should consider before making an investment in our common stock, see the section entitled “ Risk Factors .”

 

 

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Index to Financial Statements

Summary Historical Financial and Other Data

Set forth below are our summary consolidated historical and as adjusted financial and other data. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States require operating results for D&B Holdings prior to the Acquisition completed June 1, 2010 to be presented as the results of the Predecessor in the historical financial statements. Operating results of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. subsequent to the Acquisition are presented as the results of the Successor and include all periods including and subsequent to June 1, 2010.

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. has no material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of D&B Holdings. D&B Holdings has no other material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of Dave & Buster’s, Inc.

The statement of operations and cash flow data for each of the fiscal year ended January 29, 2012 (Successor) and the 244 day period from June 1, 2010 to January 30, 2011 (Successor) and the balance sheet data as of January 29, 2012 (Successor) and January 30, 2011 (Successor) were derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The statement of operations and cash flow data for each of the 120 day period from February 1, 2010 to May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 (Predecessor) were derived from the Predecessor’s audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The summary of historical financial and other data should be read in conjunction with “ Selected Consolidated Financial Data ,” “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ,” our historical consolidated financial statements and the historical consolidated financial statements of the Predecessor and the notes related thereto, included elsewhere in this prospectus. All dollar amounts are presented in thousands except per share amounts.

 

 

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Index to Financial Statements
                          Fiscal Year Ended  
    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 29,
2012
    For the
244 Day

Period from
June 1,
2010 to
January 30,

2011
          For the
120 Day

Period from
February 1,
2010 to
May 31,

2010
    January 30,
2011(1)
    January 31,
2010
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)  
                            (Non-GAAP)        

Statement of Operations Data:

             

Revenues:

             

Food and beverage revenues

  $ 272,606      $ 177,044          $ 90,470      $ 267,514      $ 269,973   

Amusement and other revenues

    268,939        166,489            87,536        254,025        250,810   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

  $ 541,545      $ 343,533          $ 178,006      $ 521,539      $ 520,783   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating costs:

             

Cost of products:

             

Cost of food and beverage

  $ 65,751      $ 41,890          $ 21,817      $ 63,707      $ 65,349   

Cost of amusement and other

    41,417        26,832            13,442        40,274        38,788   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost of products

    107,168        68,722            35,259        103,981        104,137   

Operating payroll and benefits

    130,875        85,271            43,969        129,240        132,114   

Other store operating expenses

    175,993        111,456            59,802        171,258        174,685   

General & administrative expenses(2)

    34,896        25,670            17,064        42,734        30,437   

Depreciation & amortization expense(3)

    54,277        33,794            16,224        50,018        53,658   

Pre-opening costs

    4,186        842            1,447        2,289        3,881   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating costs

    507,395        325,755            173,765        499,520        498,912   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

    34,150        17,778            4,241        22,019        21,871   

Interest expense, net

    44,931        25,486            6,976        32,462        22,122   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (10,781     (7,708         (2,735     (10,443     (251

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (3,796     (2,551         (597     (3,148     99   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (6,985   $ (5,157       $ (2,138   $ (7,295   $ (350
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per share of common stock:

             

Basic

  $ (45.58   $ (21.07         *        *        *   

Diluted

  $ (45.58   $ (21.07         *        *        *   

Weighted average number of shares outstanding:

             

Basic

    153,250        244,748            *        *        *   

Diluted

    153,250        244,748            *        *        *   

As Adjusted Consolidated Statements of Operations Data(4):

             

As Adjusted net loss

             

As Adjusted net loss per share:

             

Basic

             

Diluted

             

As Adjusted weighted average shares outstanding:

             

Basic

             

Diluted

             
 

Statement of Cash Flow Data:

             

Cash provided by (used in):

             

Operating activities

  $ 72,777      $ 25,240          $ 11,295      $ 36,535      $ 59,054   

Investing activities

    (70,502     (102,744         (12,975     (115,719     (48,406

Financing activities

    (2,998     97,034            (125     96,909        (2,500

 

* Not meaningful.

 

 

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Index to Financial Statements
     As of January 29, 2012
     Actual      As
Adjusted(4)
            (Unaudited)

Balance Sheet Data:

     

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 33,684      

Working capital deficit(5)

   $ (6,343   

Property & equipment, net

   $ 323,342      

Total assets

   $ 786,142      

Total debt, net of unamortized discount

   $ 458,497      

Stockholders’ equity

   $ 137,515      

 

                          Fiscal Year Ended  
  Fiscal Year Ended
January 29, 2012
    For the
244 Day

Period from
June 1,
2010 to
January 30,

2011
          For the
120 Day

Period from
February 1,
2010 to
May 31,

2010
    January 30,
2011(1)
    January 31,
2010
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)  
                            (Non-GAAP)        
 

Other data:

             

Adjusted EBITDA(6)

  $ 98,372      $ 57,503          $ 28,777      $ 86,280      $ 83,145   

Cash interest expense(7)

  $ 30,438      $ 24,226          $ 7,392      $ 31,618      $ 22,966   

Capital expenditures

  $ 72,946      $ 22,255          $ 12,978      $ 35,233      $ 48,423   
 

Store-level Data:

             

Stores open at end of period(8)

    59                58        56   

Comparable store sales increase (decrease)(9)

    2.2             (1.9 %)      (7.8 %) 

Store-level EBITDA(10)

  $ 127,509      $ 78,084          $ 38,976      $ 117,060      $ 109,847   

Store-level EBITDA margin(11)

    23.5     22.7         21.9     22.4     21.1

 

 

(1) Affiliates of the Oak Hill Funds acquired all of the outstanding common stock of D&B Holdings as part of the Acquisition. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States require operating results for D&B Holdings prior to the June 1, 2010 acquisition to be presented as Predecessor’s results in the historical financial statements. Operating results for Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. subsequent to the June 1, 2010 acquisition are presented or referred to as Successor’s results in our historical financial statements. References to the 52 week period ended January 30, 2011, included in this prospectus relate to the combined 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 of the Successor and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 of the Predecessor. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year.
(2) General and administrative expenses during the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011 includes $4,638 and $4,280 of transaction costs in the Successor and Predecessor periods, respectively.
(3) Depreciation expense related to the write-up of certain assets and changes of useful lives of certain assets as a result of the Acquisition was $860 for the Successor period ended January 30, 2011 and $4,055 for the fiscal year ended January 29, 2012.
(4) The as adjusted balance sheet and consolidated statements of operations data gives effect to the receipt and application of $     of net proceeds to us from this offering as described in “Use of Proceeds,” as if it had occurred as of January 29, 2012. The as adjusted balance sheet and consolidated statements of operations data is not necessarily indicative of what our financial position or results of operations would have been if the transaction had been completed as of the date indicated, nor is such data necessarily indicative of our financial position or results of operations for any future date or period.
(5) Defined as total current assets minus total current liabilities.
(6) “Adjusted EBITDA” is calculated as net income (loss), plus interest expense (net), provision (benefit) for income taxes, depreciation and amortization expense, loss (gain) on asset disposal, gain on acquisition of limited partnership, share-based compensation, currency transaction (gain) loss, pre-opening costs, reimbursement of affiliate expenses, severance, change in deferred amusement revenue and ticket liability estimations, transaction costs and other. “Adjusted EBITDA margin” represents Adjusted EBITDA divided by total revenues.

 

     Adjusted EBITDA is presented because we believe that it provides useful information to investors regarding our operating performance and our capacity to incur and service debt and fund capital expenditures. We believe that Adjusted EBITDA is used by many investors, analysts and rating agencies as a measure of performance. In addition, Adjusted EBITDA is approximately equal to “Consolidated EBITDA” as defined in our senior secured credit facility and the indentures governing the existing discount notes and the existing senior notes, and our presentation of Adjusted EBITDA is consistent with that reported to our lenders and holders of notes to allow for leverage-based assessments. By reporting Adjusted EBITDA, we provide a basis for comparison of our business operations between current, past and future periods by excluding items that we do not believe are indicative of our core operating performance. Adjusted EBITDA is a metric utilized to measure performance based bonuses paid to our executive officers and certain managers.

 

 

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     Adjusted EBITDA, however, is not defined by GAAP and should not be considered in isolation or as an alternative to other financial data prepared in accordance with GAAP or as an indicator of the Company’s operating performance. Adjusted EBITDA does not represent and should not be considered as an alternative to net income or cash flow from operations, as determined in accordance with GAAP, and our calculations thereof may not be comparable to similarly entitled measures reported by other companies. Although we use Adjusted EBITDA as a measure to assess the operating performance of our business, Adjusted EBITDA has significant limitations as an analytical tool because it excludes certain material costs. For example, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin do not take into account a number of significant items, including our interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense. Because Adjusted EBITDA does not account for these expenses, its utility as a measure of our operating performance has material limitations. In addition, Adjusted EBITDA excludes pre-opening costs and adjustments for changes in the accruals for deferred amusement revenue and ticket liability, which we expect to redeem in future periods and which may be important in analyzing our GAAP results. Our calculations of Adjusted EBITDA adjust for these amounts because they vary from period to period and do not directly relate to the ongoing operations of the current underlying business of our stores and therefore complicate comparisons of the underlying business between periods. Nevertheless, because of the limitations described above management does not view Adjusted EBITDA in isolation and also uses other measures, such as net sales, gross margin, operating income and net income (loss), to measure operating performance.

 

     Our calculation of Adjusted EBITDA for the periods presented is set forth below:

 

    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 29,
2012
    For the 244 Day
Period from

June 1, 2010 to
January 30, 2011
          For the 120 Day
Period from
February 1, 2010
to May 31, 2010
    Fiscal Year Ended  
          January 30,
2011(1)
    January 31,
2010
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)  
                            (Non-GAAP)        

Net loss

  $ (6,985   $ (5,157       $ (2,138   $ (7,295   $ (350

Interest expense, net

    44,931        25,486            6,976        32,462        22,122   

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (3,796     (2,551         (597     (3,148     99   

Depreciation and amortization expense

    54,277        33,794            16,224        50,018        53,658   

Loss (gain) on asset disposal(a)

    1,279        (2,813         416        (2,397     1,361   

Gain on acquisition of limited partnership(b)

      —              —          —          (357

Share-based compensation(c)

    1,038        794            1,697        2,491        722   

Currency transaction (gain) loss(d)

    103        (128         (15     (143     (123

Pre-opening costs(e)

    4,186        842            1,447        2,289        3,881   

Reimbursement of affiliate expenses(f)

    854        380            246        626        905   

Severance(g)

    324        1,183            —          1,183        295   

Change in deferred amusement revenue, ticket liability & other(h)

    1,639        1,035            241        1,276        932   

Transaction costs(i)

    522        4,638            4,280        8,918        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 98,372      $ 57,503          $ 28,777      $ 86,280      $ 83,145   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (a) Represents the net book value of assets (less proceeds received) disposed of during the year. Primarily relates to assets replaced in ongoing operation of business.
  (b) Represents gain recognized in connection with our acquisition of a 49.9% limited partnership interest in a limited partnership that owns a Dave & Buster’s store in the Discover Mills Mall near Atlanta, Georgia. See Notes to Audited Consolidated Financials Statements—Note 2: Mergers and Acquisitions.
  (c) Represents stock compensation expense of the Predecessor resulting from grants under the D&B Holdings, Inc. 2006 Option Plan and of the Successor under the Stock Incentive Plan.
  (d) Represents the effect of foreign currency transaction (gains) or losses related to our store in Canada.
  (e) Represents costs incurred prior to the opening of our new stores or stores that have undergone major conversions.
  (f) Represents amounts paid to Wellspring under our historical expense reimbursement agreement and expenses under an expense reimbursement agreement that we entered into with Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC. See “ Certain Relationships and Related Transactions—Expense Reimbursement Agreement .”
  (g) Represents severance costs associated with the departure of key executives and organizational restructuring efforts implemented by us.
  (h) Primarily represents quarterly increases or decreases to accrued liabilities established for future amusement game play and the fulfillment of tickets won by guests on our redemption games.
  (i) Represents transaction costs related to the Acquisition.
(7) “Cash interest expense” represents interest expense for the period less amortization of debt issuance costs, original issue discount (if any) and adjustments to mark our swap contracts to fair value, less interest capitalized during the period.
(8) The number of stores open includes one franchise in Canada. Our location in Nashville, Tennessee, which temporarily closed from May 2, 2010 to November 28, 2011 due to flooding is included in our store count for all years presented. Also included in the store counts as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010 is one store in Dallas, Texas, which permanently closed on May 2, 2011.
(9) We define the comparable store base to include those stores open for a full 18 months at the beginning of each fiscal year.

 

 

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(10) “Store-level EBITDA” is defined by us as net income (loss), plus interest expense (net), provision (benefit) for income taxes, depreciation and amortization expense, general and administrative expenses and pre-opening costs, as shown in the table below. We use Store-level EBITDA to measure operating performance and returns from opening new stores. Similar to Adjusted EBITDA, Store-level EBITDA is not defined under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and does not purport to be an alternative to net income as a measure of operating performance.

 

     We believe that Store-level EBITDA is another useful measure in evaluating our operating performance because it removes the impact of general and administrative expenses, which are not incurred at the store level, and the costs of opening new stores, which are non-recurring at the store-level, and thereby enables the comparability of the operating performance of our stores for the periods presented. We also believe that Store-level EBITDA is a useful measure in evaluating our operating performance within the entertainment and dining industry because it permits the evaluation of store-level productivity, efficiency and performance, and we use Store-level EBITDA as a means of evaluating store financial performance compared with our competitors. However, because this measure excludes significant items such as general and administrative expenses and pre-opening costs, as well as our interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense, which are important in evaluating our consolidated financial performance from period to period, the value of this measure is limited as a measure of our consolidated financial performance. Our calculation of Store-level EBITDA for the periods is presented below:

 

    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 29,
2012
    For the 244
Day Period

from
June 1,
2010 to
January 30,

2011
              For the 120
Day Period
from
February 1,
2010 to
May 31,

2010
    Fiscal Year Ended  
                 

 

 

 

January 30,
2011(1)

    January 31,
2010
 
(Dollars in thousands)   (Successor)     (Successor)               (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)  
                                (Non-GAAP)        

Net loss

  $ (6,985   $ (5,157         $ (2,138   $ (7,295   $ (350

Interest expense, net

    44,931        25,486              6,976        32,462        22,122   

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (3,796     (2,551           (597     (3,148     99   

Depreciation and amortization expense

    54,277        33,794              16,224        50,018        53,658   

General and administrative expenses

    34,896        25,670              17,064        42,734        30,437   

Pre-opening costs

    4,186        842              1,447        2,289        3,881   
 

 

 

   

 

 

         

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Store-level EBITDA

  $ 127,509      $ 78,084            $ 38,976      $ 117,060      $ 109,847   
 

 

 

   

 

 

         

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(11) “Store-level EBITDA margin” represents Store-level EBITDA divided by total revenues. Store-level EBITDA margin allows us to evaluate operating performance of each store across stores of varying size and volume.

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risks, as well as the other information contained in this prospectus, before making an investment in our company. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, results of operations or financial condition may be materially adversely affected. In such an event, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Related To Our Business

The continued economic uncertainty in the U.S. and Canada impacts our business and financial results and a renewed recession could materially affect us in the future.

Our business is dependent upon consumer discretionary spending. The continued economic uncertainty in the U.S. and Canada has reduced consumer confidence to historic lows impacting the public’s ability and/or desire to spend discretionary dollars as a result of job losses, home foreclosures, significantly reduced home values, investment losses in the financial markets, personal bankruptcies, and reduced access to credit, resulting in lower levels of guest traffic in our stores. Leading economic indicators, such as unemployment and consumer confidence, remain volatile and may not show meaningful improvement in fiscal 2012. If conditions worsen, our business, results of operation and ability to comply with the covenants under our senior secured credit facility could be materially affected and may result in a deceleration of the number and timing of new store openings. Continued deterioration in guest traffic and/or a reduction in the average amount guests spend in our stores will negatively impact our revenues. This will result in sales de-leverage, spreading fixed costs across a lower level of sales, and will in turn cause downward pressure on our profitability. This could result in reductions in staff levels, asset impairment charges and potential closures. Future recessionary effects on the Company are unknown at this time and could have a potential material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations. There can be no assurance that any government’s plans to stimulate the economy will restore consumer confidence, stabilize the financial markets, increase liquidity and the availability of credit, or result in lower unemployment.

Future economic downturns similar to the economic crisis that began in 2008 could have a material adverse impact on our landlords or other tenants in shopping centers in which we are located, which in turn could negatively affect our financial results.

If we experience another economic downturn in the future, our landlords may be unable to obtain financing or remain in good standing under their existing financing arrangements, resulting in failures to pay required construction contributions or satisfy other lease covenants to us. In addition, other tenants at shopping centers in which we are located or have executed leases may fail to open or may cease operations. Decreases in total tenant occupancy in shopping centers in which we are located may affect foot traffic at our stores. All of these factors could have a material adverse impact on our operations.

Our growth strategy depends on our ability to open new stores and operate them profitably.

As of April 15, 2012, there were 59 company-owned locations in the United States and Canada and one franchise location in Canada. A key element of our growth strategy is to open additional stores in locations that we believe will provide attractive returns on investment. We have identified a number of additional sites for potential future Dave & Buster’s stores. Our ability to open new stores on a timely and cost-effective basis, or at all, is dependent on a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control, including our ability to:

 

  Ÿ  

find quality locations;

 

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  Ÿ  

reach acceptable agreements regarding the lease or purchase of locations;

 

  Ÿ  

comply with applicable zoning, licensing, land use and environmental regulations;

 

  Ÿ  

raise or have available an adequate amount of cash or currently available financing for construction and opening costs;

 

  Ÿ  

timely hire, train and retain the skilled management and other employees necessary to meet staffing needs;

 

  Ÿ  

obtain, for acceptable cost, required permits and approvals, including liquor licenses; and

 

  Ÿ  

efficiently manage the amount of time and money used to build and open each new store.

If we succeed in opening new stores on a timely and cost-effective basis, we may nonetheless be unable to attract enough guests to new stores because potential guests may be unfamiliar with our stores or concept, or our entertainment and menu options might not appeal to them. While we have successfully opened stores with our target large store size of 35,000—40,000 square feet, only a small number of our existing stores are the size of this target. As of April 15, 2012, we operate five small format stores. Our new large and small format stores may not meet or exceed the performance of our existing stores or meet or exceed our performance targets, including target cash-on-cash returns. New stores may even operate at a loss, which could have a significant adverse effect on our overall operating results. Opening a new store in an existing market could reduce the revenue at our existing stores in that market. In addition, historically, new stores experience a drop in revenues after their first year of operation. Typically, this drop has been temporary and has been followed by increases in comparable store revenue in line with the rest of our comparable store base, but there can be no assurance that this will be the case in the future or that a new store will succeed in the long term.

Our expansion into new markets may present increased risks due to our unfamiliarity with the area.

Some of our new stores will be located in areas where we have little or no meaningful experience. Those markets may have different competitive conditions, consumer tastes and discretionary spending patterns than our existing markets, which may cause our new stores to be less successful than stores in our existing markets. In addition, our national advertising program may not be successful in generating brand awareness in all local markets, and the lack of market awareness of the Dave & Buster’s brand can pose an additional risk in expanding into new markets. Stores opened in new markets may open at lower average weekly revenues than stores opened in existing markets, and may have higher store-level operating expense ratios than stores in existing markets. Sales at stores opened in new markets may take longer to reach average store revenues, if at all, thereby adversely affecting our overall profitability.

We may not be able to compete favorably in the highly competitive out-of-home and home-based entertainment and restaurant markets, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

The out-of-home entertainment market is highly competitive. We compete for guests’ discretionary entertainment dollars with theme parks, as well as with providers of out-of-home entertainment, including localized attraction facilities such as movie theatres, sporting events, bowling alleys, nightclubs and restaurants. Many of the entities operating these businesses are larger and have significantly greater financial resources, a greater number of stores, have been in business longer, have greater name recognition and are better established in the markets where our stores are located or are planned to be located. As a result, they may be able to invest greater resources than we can in attracting guests and succeed in attracting guests who would otherwise come to our stores. The legalization of casino gambling in geographic areas near any current or future store would create the possibility for entertainment alternatives, which could have a material adverse effect on our business

 

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and financial condition. We also face competition from local establishments that offer entertainment experiences similar to ours and restaurants that are highly competitive with respect to price, quality of service, location, ambience and type and quality of food. We also face competition from increasingly sophisticated home-based forms of entertainment, such as internet and video gaming and home movie delivery. Our failure to compete favorably in the competitive out-of-home and home-based entertainment and restaurant markets could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our quarterly results of operations are subject to fluctuations due to the seasonality of our business and other events.

Our operating results fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter as a result of seasonal factors. Typically we have higher first and fourth quarter revenues associated with the spring and year-end holidays. Our third quarter, which encompasses the end of the summer vacation season, has historically had lower revenues as compared to the other quarters. We expect seasonality will continue to be a factor in our results of operations. As a result, factors affecting peak seasons could have a disproportionate effect on our results. For example, the number of days between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day and the days of the week on which Christmas and New Year’s Eve fall affect the volume of business we generate during the December holiday season and can affect our results for the full fiscal year. In addition, adverse weather during the winter and spring seasons can have a significant impact on our first and fourth quarters, and therefore our results for the full fiscal year. See “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Store-Level Variability, Quarterly Results of Operations and Seasonality .”

Our operating results may also fluctuate significantly because of non-seasonal factors. Due to our relatively limited number of locations, poor results of operations at any single store could significantly affect our overall profitability.

Our quarterly results of operations are subject to fluctuations due to the timing of new store openings.

The timing of new store openings may result in significant fluctuations in our quarterly performance. We typically incur most cash pre-opening costs for a new store within the two months immediately preceding, and the month of, the store’s opening. In addition, the labor and operating costs for a newly opened store during the first three to six months of operation are materially greater than what can be expected after that time, both in aggregate dollars and as a percentage of revenues. We expect to spend approximately $40.0 million ($31.0 million net of cash contributions from landlords) for new store construction in 2012. Due to these substantial up-front financial requirements to open new stores, the investment risk related to any single store is much larger than that associated with many other restaurants or entertainment venues.

We have a recent history of net losses.

We have high interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense and, as a result, incurred net losses of $7.0 million and $7.3 million for the fiscal years ended January 29, 2012 and January 30, 2011 (combined), respectively. Achieving profitability depends upon numerous factors, including our ability to generate increased revenues and our ability to control expenses. We may incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons, including the other risks described in this prospectus and our ongoing interest and depreciation and amortization expense, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown events. Accordingly, we can make no assurances that we will be able to achieve, sustain or increase profitability in the future. Failure to achieve profitability could have an adverse impact on the trading prices of our common stock.

 

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Our operations are susceptible to the availability and cost of food and other supplies, in most cases from a limited number of suppliers, which subject us to possible risks of shortages, interruptions and price fluctuations.

Our profitability depends in part on our ability to anticipate and react to changes in product costs. Cost of food and beverage as a percentage of food and beverage revenue was 24.1% in fiscal 2011, 23.8% in fiscal 2010 (combined), and 24.2% in fiscal 2009. Cost of food as a percentage of total revenue was approximately 8.6% in fiscal 2011, 8.5% in fiscal 2010 and 8.5% in fiscal 2009. Cost of amusement and other costs as a percentage of amusement and other revenue was 15.4% in fiscal 2011, 15.9% in fiscal 2010 (combined) and 15.5% in fiscal 2009. If we have to pay higher prices for food or other supplies, our operating costs may increase, and, if we are unable or unwilling to pass such cost increases on to our guests, our operating results could be adversely affected.

We entered into a long-term contract with U.S. Foodservice, Inc. that provides for the purchasing, warehousing and distributing of a substantial majority of our food, non-alcoholic beverage and chemical supplies. Our current contract with U.S. Foodservice, Inc. expires in fiscal 2012. We plan to negotiate a new long-term distribution contract with our current provider or alternate providers of similar distribution services.

The unplanned loss of this distributor could adversely affect our business by disrupting our operations as we seek out and negotiate a new distribution contract. We also have multiple short-term supply contracts with a limited number of suppliers. If any of these suppliers do not perform adequately or otherwise fail to distribute products or supplies to our stores, we may be unable to replace the suppliers in a short period of time on acceptable terms, which could increase our costs, cause shortages of food and other items at our stores and cause us to remove certain items from our menu. Other than forward purchase contracts for certain food items, we currently do not engage in futures contracts or other financial risk management strategies with respect to potential price fluctuations in the cost of food and other supplies.

We may not be able to anticipate and react to changing food, beverage and amusement costs by adjusting purchasing practices or menu and game prices, and a failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

Our procurement of games and amusement offerings is dependent upon a few suppliers.

Our ability to continue to procure new games, amusement offerings, and other entertainment-related equipment is important to our business strategy. The number of suppliers from which we can purchase games, amusement offerings and other entertainment-related equipment is limited. To the extent that the number of suppliers declines, we could be subject to the risk of distribution delays, pricing pressure, lack of innovation and other associated risks.

In addition, any increase in cost or decrease in availability of new amusement offerings that appeal to guests could adversely impact the cost to acquire and operate new amusements which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results. We may not be able to anticipate and react to increases in the cost of amusement offerings by adjusting purchasing practices or game prices, and a failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

Instances of food-borne illness and outbreaks of disease, as well as negative publicity relating thereto, could result in reduced demand for our menu offerings and reduced traffic in our stores and negatively impact our business.

Our business could be severely impacted by a widespread regional, national or global health epidemic. A widespread health epidemic (such as the avian flu) or food-borne illness (such as

 

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aphthous fever, which is also known as hoof and mouth disease, as well as hepatitis A, lysteria, salmonella and e-coli), whether or not traced to one of our stores, may cause guests to avoid public gathering places or otherwise change their eating behaviors. Even the prospects of a health epidemic could change consumer perceptions of food safety, disrupt our supply chain and impact our ability to supply certain menu items or staff our stores. Outbreaks of disease, including severe acute respiratory syndrome, which is also known as SARS, as well as influenza, could reduce traffic in our stores. Any of these events would negatively impact our business. In addition, any negative publicity relating to these and other health-related matters may affect consumers’ perceptions of our stores and the food that we offer, reduce guest visits to our stores and negatively impact demand for our menu offerings.

We may not be able to obtain and maintain licenses and permits necessary to operate our stores in compliance with laws, regulations and other requirements, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws affecting our business. Each store is subject to licensing and regulation by a number of governmental authorities, which may include alcoholic beverage control, amusement, health and safety and fire agencies in the state, county or municipality in which the store is located. Each store is required to obtain a license to sell alcoholic beverages on the premises from a state authority and, in certain locations, county and municipal authorities. Typically, licenses must be renewed annually and may be revoked or suspended for cause at any time. In the past, we have had licenses temporarily suspended. For example, our licenses to sell alcoholic beverages were suspended for 2 days in 2011 in our Maple Grove, Minnesota store, for 10 days in 2010 in our Milpitas, California store and for 25 days in 2008 in our Ontario, California store, each due to violations of the terms of our licenses. In some states, the loss of a license for cause with respect to one location may lead to the loss of licenses at all locations in that state and could make it more difficult to obtain additional licenses in that state. Alcoholic beverage control regulations relate to numerous aspects of the daily operations of each store, including minimum age of patrons and employees, hours of operation, advertising, wholesale purchasing, inventory control and handling and storage and dispensing of alcoholic beverages. The failure to receive or retain a liquor license, or any other required permit or license, in a particular location, or to continue to qualify for, or renew licenses, could have a material adverse effect on operations and our ability to obtain such a license or permit in other locations.

As a result of operating certain entertainment games and attractions, including games that offer redemption prizes, we are subject to amusement licensing and regulation by the states, counties and municipalities in which our stores are located. Certain entertainment attractions are heavily regulated and such regulations vary significantly between communities. Moreover, as more states and local communities implement legalized gambling, the corresponding enabling regulations may also be applicable to our redemption games and regulators may create new licensing requirements, taxes or fees, or restrictions on the various types of redemption games we offer. From time-to-time, existing stores may be required to modify certain games, alter the mix of games, or terminate the use of specific games as a result of the interpretation of regulations by state or local officials, any of which could adversely affect our operations.

Changes in laws, regulations and other requirements could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

We are also subject to federal, state and local environmental laws, regulations and other requirements. More stringent and varied requirements of local and state governmental bodies with respect to zoning, land use and environmental factors could delay or prevent development of new stores in particular locations. Environmental laws and regulations also govern, among other things, discharges of pollutants into the air and water as well as the presence, handling, release and disposal

 

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of and exposure to hazardous substances. These laws provide for significant fines and penalties for noncompliance. Third parties may also make personal injury, property damage or other claims against us associated with actual or alleged release of or exposure to hazardous substances at our properties. We could also be strictly liable, without regard to fault, for certain environmental conditions at properties we formerly owned or operated as well as at our current properties.

In addition, we are subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act (which governs such matters as minimum wages and overtime), the Americans with Disabilities Act, various family-leave mandates and other federal, state and local laws and regulations that govern working conditions. From time-to-time, the U.S. Congress and the states consider increases in the applicable minimum wage. Several states in which we operate have enacted increases in the minimum wage which have taken effect during the past several years and further increases are anticipated. Although we expect increases in payroll expenses as a result of federal and state mandated increases in the minimum wage, such increases are not expected to be material. However, we are uncertain of the repercussion, if any, of increased minimum wages on other expenses. For example, our suppliers may be more severely impacted by higher minimum wage standards, which could result in increased costs to us. If we are unable to offset these costs through increased costs to our guests, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected. Moreover, although none of our employees have been or are now represented by any unions, labor organizations may seek to represent certain of our employees in the future, and if they are successful, our payroll expenses and other labor costs may be increased in the course of collective bargaining, and/or there may be strikes or other work disruptions that may adversely affect our business.

Our sales and results of operations may be adversely affected by the passage of health care reform legislation and climate change and other environmental legislation and regulations. The costs and other effects of new legal requirements cannot be determined with certainty. For example, new legislation or regulations may result in increased costs directly for our compliance or indirectly to the extent that such requirements increase prices charged to us by vendors because of increased compliance costs. At this point, we are unable to determine the impact that health care reform could have on our employer-sponsored medical plans or that climate change and other environmental legislation and regulations could have on our overall business.

We face potential liability with our gift cards under the property laws of some states.

Our gift cards, which may be used to purchase food, beverage, merchandise and game play credits in our stores, may be considered stored value cards. Certain states include gift cards under their abandoned and unclaimed property laws, and require companies to remit to the state cash in an amount equal to all or a designated portion of the unredeemed balance on the gift cards based on certain card attributes and the length of time that the cards are inactive. To date we have not remitted any amounts relating to unredeemed gift cards to states based upon our assessment of applicable laws. We recognize income from unredeemed cards when we determine that the likelihood of the cards being redeemed is remote and that recognition is appropriate based on governing state statutes.

The analysis of the potential application of the abandoned and unclaimed property laws to our gift cards is complex, involving an analysis of constitutional, statutory provisions and factual issues. In the event that one or more states change their existing abandoned and unclaimed property laws or successfully challenges our position on the application of its abandoned and unclaimed property laws to our gift cards, or if the estimates that we use in projecting the likelihood of the cards being redeemed prove to be inaccurate, our liabilities with respect to unredeemed gift cards may be materially higher than the amounts shown in our financial statements. If we are required to materially increase the estimated liability recorded in our financial statements with respect to unredeemed gift cards, our net income could be materially and adversely affected.

 

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Our Power Cards may raise similar concerns to gift cards in terms of the applicability of states’ abandoned and unclaimed property laws. However, based on our analysis of abandoned and unclaimed property laws, we believe that our Power Cards are not stored value cards and such laws do not apply, although there can be no assurance that states will not take a different position.

Guest complaints or litigation on behalf of our guests or employees may adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Our business may be adversely affected by legal or governmental proceedings brought by or on behalf of our guests or employees. In recent years, a number of restaurant companies, including ours, have been subject to lawsuits, including class action lawsuits, alleging violations of federal and state law regarding workplace and employment matters, discrimination and similar matters, and a number of these lawsuits have resulted in the payment of substantial damages by the defendants. We could also face potential liability if we are found to have misclassified certain employees as exempt from the overtime requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and state labor laws. We have had from time to time and now have such lawsuits pending against us. In addition, from time to time, guests file complaints or lawsuits against us alleging that we are responsible for some illness or injury they suffered at or after a visit to a store. We are also subject to a variety of other claims in the ordinary course of business, including personal injury, lease and contract claims. The restaurant industry has also been subject to a growing number of claims that the menus and actions of restaurant chains have led to the obesity of certain of their guests.

We are also subject to “dram shop” statutes in certain states in which our stores are located. These statutes generally provide a person injured by an intoxicated person the right to recover damages from an establishment that wrongfully served alcoholic beverages to the intoxicated individual. We are currently the subject of certain lawsuits that allege violations of these statutes. Recent litigation against restaurant chains has resulted in significant judgments and settlements under dram shop statutes. Because these cases often seek punitive damages, which may not be covered by insurance, such litigation could have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Regardless of whether any claims against us are valid or whether we are liable, claims may be expensive to defend and may divert time and money away from operations and hurt our financial performance. A judgment significantly in excess of our insurance coverage or not covered by insurance could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. As approximately 30.2% of our food and beverage revenues were derived from the sale of alcoholic beverages during fiscal 2011, adverse publicity resulting from these allegations may materially affect our stores and us.

We may face labor shortages that could slow our growth and adversely impact our ability to operate our stores.

The successful operation of our business depends upon our ability to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of qualified executives, managers and skilled employees. From time-to-time, there may be a shortage of skilled labor in certain of the communities in which our stores are located. Shortages of skilled labor may make it increasingly difficult and expensive to attract, train and retain the services of a satisfactory number of qualified employees and could delay the planned openings of new stores or adversely impact our existing stores. Any such delays, material increases in employee turnover rates in existing stores or widespread employee dissatisfaction could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Competition for qualified employees could require us to pay higher wages, which could result in higher labor costs and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

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Immigration reform continues to attract significant attention in the public arena and the U.S. Congress. If new immigration legislation is enacted, such laws may contain provisions that could increase our costs in recruiting, training and retaining employees. Also, although our hiring practices comply with the requirements of federal law in reviewing employees’ citizenship or authority to work in the U.S., increased enforcement efforts with respect to existing immigration laws by governmental authorities may disrupt a portion of our workforce or our operations at one or more of our stores, thereby negatively impacting our business.

We depend on the services of key executives, the loss of whom could materially harm our business and our strategic direction if we were unable to replace them with executives of equal experience and capabilities.

Our future success significantly depends on the continued service and performance of our key management personnel. We have employment agreements with all members of senior management. However, we cannot prevent members of senior management from terminating their employment with us. Losing the services of members of senior management could materially harm our business until a suitable replacement is found, and such replacement may not have equal experience and capabilities. In addition, we have not purchased life insurance on any members of our senior management.

Local conditions, events, terrorist attacks, adverse weather conditions and natural disasters could adversely affect our business.

Certain of the regions in which our stores are located have been, and may in the future be, subject to adverse local conditions, events, terrorist attacks, adverse weather conditions, or natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, floods and hurricanes. In particular, seven of our stores are located in California and are subject to earthquake risk, and our four stores in Florida, our two stores in Houston and our one store in Honolulu are subject to hurricane risk. Depending upon its magnitude, a natural disaster could severely damage our stores, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. We currently maintain property and business interruption insurance through the aggregate property policy for each of the stores. However, such coverage may not be sufficient if there is a major disaster. In addition, upon the expiration of our current insurance policies, adequate insurance coverage may not be available at reasonable rates, or at all.

Damage to our brand or reputation could adversely affect our business.

Our brand and our reputation are among our most important assets. Our ability to attract and retain guests depends, in part, upon the external perception of our company, the quality of our food service and facilities, and our integrity. Multi-store businesses, such as ours, can be adversely affected by unfavorable publicity resulting from poor food quality, illness or health concerns, or a variety of other operating issues stemming from one or a limited number of stores. Adverse publicity involving any of these factors could make our stores less appealing, reduce our guest traffic and/or impose practical limits on pricing. In the future, more of our stores may be operated by franchisees. Any such franchisees will be independent third parties that we do not control. Although our franchisees will be contractually obligated to operate the store in accordance with our standards, we would not oversee their daily operations. If one or more of our stores were the subject of unfavorable publicity, our overall brand could be adversely affected, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may not be able to renew real property leases on favorable terms, or at all, which may require us to close a store or relocate, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Of the 59 stores operated by us as of April 15, 2012, all are operated on leased property. The leases typically provide for a base rent plus additional rent based on a percentage of the revenue

 

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generated by the stores on the leased premises once certain thresholds are met. A lease on one of our stores is scheduled to expire during fiscal 2012 and does not have an option to renew. A decision not to renew a lease for a store could be based on a number of factors, including an assessment of the area in which the store is located. We may choose not to renew, or may not be able to renew, certain of such existing leases if the capital investment then required to maintain the stores at the leased locations is not justified by the return on the required investment. If we are not able to renew the leases at rents that allow such stores to remain profitable as their terms expire, the number of such stores may decrease, resulting in lower revenue from operations, or we may relocate a store, which could subject us to construction and other costs and risks, and, in either case, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Fixed rental payments account for a significant portion of our operating expenses, which increases our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions and could limit our operating and financial flexibility.

Payments under our operating leases account for a significant portion of our operating expenses. For example, total rental payments, including additional rental payments based on sales at some of our stores, under operating leases were approximately $48.9 million, or 9.0% of our total revenues, in fiscal 2011. In addition, as of January 29, 2012, we were a party to operating leases requiring future minimum lease payments aggregating approximately $97.4 million through the next two years and approximately $373.6 million thereafter. We expect that we will lease any new stores we open under operating leases. Our substantial operating lease obligations could have significant negative consequences, including:

 

  Ÿ  

increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

  Ÿ  

limiting our ability to obtain additional financing;

 

  Ÿ  

requiring a substantial portion of our available cash to be applied to pay our rental obligations, thus reducing cash available for other purposes;

 

  Ÿ  

limiting our flexibility in planning for or reacting to changes in our business or the industry in which we compete; and

 

  Ÿ  

placing us at a disadvantage with respect to our competitors.

We depend on cash flow from operations to pay our lease obligations and to fulfill our other cash needs. If our business does not generate sufficient cash flow from operating activities and sufficient funds are not otherwise available to us from borrowings under bank loans or from other sources, we may not be able to service our operating lease obligations, grow our business, respond to competitive challenges or fund our other liquidity and capital needs, which would have a material adverse effect on us.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property.

Our intellectual property is essential to our success and competitive position. We use a combination of intellectual property rights, such as trademarks and trade secrets, to protect our brand and certain other proprietary processes and information material to our business. The success of our business strategy depends, in part, on our continued ability to use our intellectual property rights to increase brand awareness and further develop our branded products in both existing and new markets. If we fail to protect our intellectual property rights adequately, we may lose an important advantage in the markets in which we compete. If third parties misappropriate or infringe our intellectual property, the value of our image, brand and the goodwill associated therewith may be diminished, our brand may fail to achieve and maintain market recognition, and our competitive position may be harmed, any of

 

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which could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our revenues. Policing unauthorized use of our intellectual property is difficult, and we can not be certain that the steps we have taken will prevent the violation or misappropriation of such intellectual property rights by others. To protect our intellectual property, we may become involved in litigation, which could result in substantial expenses, divert the attention of management, and adversely affect our revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

We cannot be certain that our products and services do not and will not infringe on the intellectual property rights of others. Any such claims, regardless of merit, could be time-consuming and expensive to litigate or settle, divert the attention of management, cause significant delays, materially disrupt the conduct of our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. As a consequence of such claims, we could be required to pay a substantial damage award, take a royalty-bearing license, discontinue the use of third party products used within our operations and/or rebrand our business and products.

Failure to establish and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results.

Maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to produce reliable financial reports and is important in helping to prevent financial fraud. If we are unable to maintain adequate internal controls, our business and operating results could be harmed. Any failure to remediate deficiencies noted by our management or our independent registered public accounting firm or to implement required new or improved controls or difficulties encountered in their implementation could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations or result in material misstatements in our financial statements.

Disruptions in our information technology systems could have an adverse impact on our operations.

Our operations are dependent upon the integrity, security and consistent operation of various systems and data centers, including the point-of-sale, kiosk and amusement operations systems in our stores, data centers that process transactions, communication systems and various other software applications used throughout our operations. Disruptions in these systems could have an adverse impact on our operations. We could encounter difficulties in developing new systems or maintaining and upgrading existing systems. Such difficulty could lead to significant expenses or to losses due to disruption in our business operations. In 2007, there was an external breach of our credit card processing systems which led to fraudulent credit card activity and resulted in the payment of fines and reimbursements for the fraudulent credit card activity. As part of a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, we have implemented a series of corrective measures in order to ensure that our computer systems are secure and that our guests’ personal information is protected. Despite our considerable efforts and investment in technology to secure our computer network, security could still be compromised, confidential information could be misappropriated or system disruptions could occur in the future. This could lead to a loss of sales or profits or cause us to incur significant costs to reimburse third parties for damages.

Our current insurance policies may not provide adequate levels of coverage against all claims and we may incur losses that are not covered by our insurance.

We believe we maintain insurance coverage that is customary for businesses of our size and type. However, there are types of losses we may incur that cannot be insured against or that we believe are not commercially reasonable to insure. For example, we maintain business interruption

 

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insurance, but there can be no assurance that the coverage for a severe or prolonged business interruption at one or more of our stores would be adequate. Given the limited number of stores we operate, such a loss could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. In addition, we do not currently carry insurance for breaches of our computer network security. Moreover, we believe that insurance covering liability for violations of wage and hour laws is generally not available. These losses, if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Risks Relating to this Offering

Our stock price may fluctuate significantly, and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the initial public offering price.

The trading price of our common stock may be volatile and subject to wide price fluctuations in response to various factors, including:

 

  Ÿ  

market conditions in the broader stock market;

 

  Ÿ  

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly financial condition and results of operations;

 

  Ÿ  

actual or anticipated strategic, technological or regulatory threats, whether or not warranted by actual events;

 

  Ÿ  

issuance of new or changed securities analysts’ reports or recommendations;

 

  Ÿ  

investor perceptions of our company or the media and entertainment industries;

 

  Ÿ  

sales, or anticipated sales, of large blocks of our stock;

 

  Ÿ  

additions or departures of key management personnel, creative or other talent;

 

  Ÿ  

regulatory or political developments;

 

  Ÿ  

litigation and governmental investigations; and

 

  Ÿ  

macroeconomic conditions.

Furthermore, the stock market has experienced extreme volatility that in some cases has been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of particular companies. These and other factors may cause the market price and demand for our common stock to fluctuate substantially, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their shares of common stock and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our common stock. In addition, in the past, when the market price of a stock has been volatile, holders of that stock have sometimes instituted securities class action litigation against the company that issued the stock. If any of our stockholders were to bring a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management from our business.

There is no existing market for our common stock, and we do not know if one will develop to provide you with adequate liquidity.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for shares of our common stock. We cannot predict the extent to which investor interest in our company will lead to the development of a trading market on the NYSE or NASDAQ, or how liquid that market may become. If an active trading market does not develop or is not sustained, you may have difficulty selling any of our common stock that you purchase at an attractive price or at all. The initial public offering price of shares of our common stock will be determined by negotiation between us and the underwriters and may not be indicative of prices that will prevail in the open market following the completion of this offering. The market price of shares of our common stock may decline below the initial public offering price, and you may not be able to resell your shares of our common stock at or above the initial offering price, or at all.

 

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We do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

We do not anticipate paying any dividends in the foreseeable future on our common stock. We intend to retain all future earnings for the operation and expansion of our business and the repayment of outstanding debt. Our senior secured credit facility, the existing senior notes and the existing discount notes contain, and any future indebtedness likely will contain, restrictive covenants that impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and make other restricted payments. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our common stock will be your sole source of gain for the foreseeable future. While we may change this policy at some point in the future, we cannot assure you that we will make such a change. See “ Dividend Policy .”

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, if they adversely change their recommendations regarding our stock or if our results of operations do not meet their expectations, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline. Moreover, if one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade recommendations regarding our stock, or if our results of operations do not meet their expectations, our stock price could decline and such decline could be material.

You will experience immediate and substantial dilution as a result of this offering and may experience additional dilution in the future.

The initial public offering price is substantially higher than the book value per share of our outstanding common stock. As a result, you will incur immediate and substantial dilution of $             per share. We also have a large number of outstanding stock options to purchase common stock with exercise prices that are below the estimated initial public offering price of our common stock. To the extent that these options are exercised, you will experience further dilution. For additional information, see the section of this prospectus entitled “ Dilution .”

You may be diluted by the future issuance of additional common stock in connection with our incentive plans, acquisitions or otherwise.

After this offering, we will have              shares of common stock authorized but unissued. Our certificate of incorporation authorizes us to issue these shares of common stock and options, rights, warrants and appreciation rights relating to common stock for the consideration and on the terms and conditions established by our Board of Directors in its sole discretion, whether in connection with acquisitions or otherwise. We have reserved              shares for issuance under our Stock Incentive Plan. See “ Executive Compensation—Annual Incentive Plan .” Any common stock that we issue, including under our Stock Incentive Plan or other equity incentive plans that we may adopt in the future, would dilute the percentage ownership held by the investors who purchase common stock in this offering.

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public markets, or the perception that such sales might occur, could reduce the price of our common stock and may dilute your voting power and your ownership interest in us.

If our existing stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market following this offering, the market price of our common stock could decrease significantly. The

 

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perception in the public market that our existing stockholders might sell shares of common stock could also depress our market price. Upon the completion of this offering, we will have              shares of common stock outstanding. We, our directors and our executive officers, the selling stockholders and our significant stockholders will be subject to the lock-up agreements described in “ Underwriting ” and are subject to the Rule 144 holding period requirements described in “ Shares Eligible for Future Sale .” Following the expiration of the lock-up period,              will have the right, subject to certain conditions, to require us to register the sale of its shares of our common stock under the Securities Act. After the lock-up period has expired and the holding periods have elapsed and the lock-up periods set forth in our stockholders’ agreement to be entered into in connection with this offering have expired,              additional shares will be eligible for sale in the public market. The market price of shares of our common stock may drop significantly when the restrictions on resale by our existing stockholders lapse or when we are required to register the sale of our stockholders’ remaining shares of our common stock. A decline in the price of shares of our common stock might impede our ability to raise capital through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities.

Our costs could increase significantly as a result of operating as a public company, and our management will be required to devote substantial time to complying with public company regulations.

As a public company and particularly after we cease to be an “emerging growth company” (to the extent that we take advantage of certain exceptions from reporting requirements that are available under the JOBS Act as an “emerging growth company”), we could incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses not presently incurred. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”), as well as rules promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), the NYSE and NASDAQ, require us to adopt corporate governance practices applicable to U.S. public companies. These rules and regulations may increase our legal and financial compliance costs.

Sarbanes-Oxley, as well as rules and regulations subsequently implemented by the SEC, the NYSE and NASDAQ, have imposed increased disclosure and enhanced corporate governance practices for public companies. We are committed to maintaining high standards of corporate governance and public disclosure, and our efforts to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards are likely to result in increased expenses and a diversion of management’s time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. We may not be successful in implementing these requirements and implementing them could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, if we fail to implement the requirements with respect to our internal accounting and audit functions, our ability to report our financial results on a timely and accurate basis could be impaired.

We are an “emerging growth company” and may elect to comply with reduced reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, which could make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. In addition, even if we comply with the greater obligations of public companies that are not emerging growth companies immediately after the initial public offering, we may avail ourselves of the reduced requirements applicable to emerging growth companies from time to time in the future. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive if we choose to rely on these exemptions.

 

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If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. However, we are choosing to opt out of any extended transition period, and as a result we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period.

Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.

We are not currently required to comply with the SEC rules that implement Sections 302 and 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley and are therefore not required to make a formal assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting for that purpose. Upon becoming a public company, we will be required to comply with certain of these rules, which will require management to certify financial and other information in our quarterly and annual reports and provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Though we will be required to disclose changes made in our internal control procedures on a quarterly basis, if we take advantage of certain exceptions from reporting requirements that are available to “emerging growth companies” under the JOBS Act, we will not be required to make our first annual assessment of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until the later of the year following our first annual report required to be filed with the SEC or the date we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act.

Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting until the later of the year following our first annual report required to be filed with the SEC or the date we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event it is not satisfied with the level at which our controls are documented, designed or operating.

Provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and Delaware law may discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company or changes in our management and, therefore, may depress the trading price of our stock.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws include certain provisions that could have the effect of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change of control of our company or changes in our management, including, among other things:

 

  Ÿ  

restrictions on the ability of our stockholders to fill a vacancy on the board of directors;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to issue preferred stock with terms that the Board of Directors may determine, without stockholder approval, which could be used to significantly dilute the ownership of a hostile acquirer;

 

  Ÿ  

the inability of our stockholders to call a special meeting of stockholders;

 

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  Ÿ  

our directors may only be removed from the Board of Directors for cause by the affirmative vote of (i) a majority of the remaining members of the Board of Directors or (ii) the holders of at least 66  2 / 3 % of the voting power of outstanding shares of our common stock entitled to vote thereon;

 

  Ÿ  

the absence of cumulative voting in the election of directors, which may limit the ability of minority stockholders to elect directors; and

 

  Ÿ  

advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and nominations, which may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from soliciting proxies to elect a particular slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of us.

These provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company that is in the best interest of our minority stockholders. Even in the absence of a takeover attempt, the existence of these provisions may adversely affect the prevailing market price of our common stock if they are viewed as discouraging future takeover attempts.

Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law may affect the ability of an “interested stockholder” to engage in certain business combinations, including mergers, consolidations or acquisitions of additional shares, for a period of three years following the time that the stockholder becomes an “interested stockholder.” An “interested stockholder” is defined to include persons owning directly or indirectly 15% or more of the outstanding voting stock of a corporation. However, our certificate of incorporation provides that we will not be governed by Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law.

Risks Relating to Our Capital Structure

Our indebtedness could adversely affect our ability to raise additional capital to fund operations, limit our ability to react to changes in the economy or our industry and prevent us from meeting our financial obligations.

As of January 29, 2012, as adjusted to give effect to this offering and the application of the proceeds thereof, we had $             million ($             million net of discount) of borrowings under our term loan facility, no borrowings under our revolving credit facility, $4.9 million in letters of credit outstanding, $             million aggregate principal amount of the existing senior notes outstanding and $             million aggregate principal amount of the existing discount notes outstanding. If we cannot generate sufficient cash flow from operations to service our debt, we may need to further refinance our debt, dispose of assets or issue equity to obtain necessary funds. We do not know whether we will be able to do any of this on a timely basis or on terms satisfactory to us or at all.

Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences, including:

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to obtain additional debt or equity financing for working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements, acquisitions, new store growth and general corporate or other purposes may be limited;

 

  Ÿ  

a portion of our cash flows from operations will be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on the indebtedness and will not be available for other purposes, including operations, capital expenditures and future business opportunities;

 

  Ÿ  

certain of our borrowings are at variable rates of interest, exposing us to the risk of increased interest rates;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to adjust to changing market conditions may be limited and may place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to less-leveraged competitors; and

 

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  Ÿ  

we may be vulnerable in a downturn in general economic conditions or in business, or may be unable to carry on capital spending that is important to our growth.

The terms of our senior secured credit facility, the existing senior notes and the existing discount notes restrict our current and future operations, which could adversely affect our ability to respond to changes in our business and to manage our operations.

Our senior secured credit facility, the existing senior notes and the existing discount notes contain, and any future indebtedness will likely contain, a number of restrictive covenants that impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions on our ability to, among other things:

 

  Ÿ  

incur additional debt;

 

  Ÿ  

pay dividends and make other restricted payments;

 

  Ÿ  

create liens;

 

  Ÿ  

make investments and acquisitions;

 

  Ÿ  

engage in sales of assets and subsidiary stock;

 

  Ÿ  

enter into sale-leaseback transactions;

 

  Ÿ  

enter into transactions with affiliates;

 

  Ÿ  

transfer all or substantially all of our assets or enter into merger or consolidation transactions;

 

  Ÿ  

hedge currency and interest rate risk; and

 

  Ÿ  

make capital expenditures.

Our senior secured credit facility requires us to maintain certain financial ratios in the event we draw on our revolving credit facility or issue letters of credit in excess of $12.0 million. Failure by us to comply with the covenants contained in the instruments governing our indebtedness could result in an event of default under the facility which could adversely affect our ability to respond to changes in our business and manage our operations. In the event of any default under our senior secured credit facility, the lenders will not be required to lend any additional amounts to us. Our lenders also could elect to declare all amounts outstanding to be due and payable and require us to apply all of our available cash to repay these amounts. If our indebtedness were to be accelerated, our assets may not be sufficient to repay this indebtedness in full.

In addition, absent an increase in our Adjusted EBITDA, as defined in the indentures governing the existing discount notes and the existing senior notes, we would not be permitted to incur a substantial amount of indebtedness under the incurrence limitations of the indentures, other than pursuant to our revolving credit facility and other limited exceptions.

After this offering, our principal stockholder will continue to have substantial control over us.

After the consummation of this offering, the Oak Hill Funds will collectively beneficially own approximately     % of our outstanding common stock, and approximately     % of our outstanding common stock if the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares is exercised in full. See “ Principal Stockholders .” As a consequence, the Oak Hill Funds or their affiliates will be able to control matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors, a merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets, and any other significant transaction. The interests of this stockholder may not always coincide with our interests or the interests of our other stockholders. For instance, this concentration of ownership may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of us otherwise favored by our other stockholders and could depress our stock price.

 

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As a result of affiliates of the Oak Hill Funds continuing to control a majority of our outstanding common stock after the consummation of this offering, we are a “controlled company” within the meaning of the NYSE and NASDAQ corporate governance standards. Under these rules, a “controlled company” may elect not to comply with certain NYSE or NASDAQ corporate governance standards, including:

 

  Ÿ  

the requirement that a majority of the Board of Directors consist of independent directors;

 

  Ÿ  

the requirement that we have a nominating and corporate governance committee that is composed entirely of independent directors with a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities;

 

  Ÿ  

the requirement that we have a compensation committee that is composed entirely of independent directors with a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities; and

 

  Ÿ  

the requirement for an annual performance evaluation of the nominating and corporate governance committee and compensation committee.

Following this offering, we intend to utilize these exemptions. As a result, we may not have a majority of independent directors, our nominating and corporate governance committee and compensation committee will not consist entirely of independent directors and such committees will not be subject to annual performance evaluations. Accordingly, our stockholders will not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are subject to all of the NYSE or NASDAQ corporate governance requirements.

Conflicts of interest may arise because some of our directors are principals of our principal stockholder.

Upon the completion of this offering, representatives of the Oak Hill Funds and their affiliates will occupy a majority of the seats on our Board of Directors. The Oak Hill Funds or their affiliates could invest in entities that directly or indirectly compete with us. As a result of these relationships, when conflicts arise between the interests of the Oak Hill Funds or their affiliates and the interests of our stockholders, these directors may not be disinterested. The representatives of the Oak Hill Funds on our Board of Directors, by the terms of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and an amended and restated stockholders’ agreement that will be entered into in connection with this offering, are not required to offer us any transaction opportunity of which they become aware and could take any such opportunity for themselves or offer it to other companies in which they have an investment, unless such opportunity is expressly offered to them solely in their capacity as our directors. In addition, under the amended and restated stockholders’ agreement, the Oak Hill Funds will be permitted to disclose our confidential information to their affiliates, and the Oak Hill Funds and their affiliates will be permitted to disclose our confidential information if requested or required by law. The Oak Hill Funds and their affiliates will also be permitted to disclose our confidential information to any potential purchaser of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. that executes an acceptable confidentiality agreement with Dave & Buster’s.

The Oak Hill Funds will be entitled to designate directors to serve on the Board of Directors proportionate to the Oak Hill Funds’ (or one or more of their affiliates) aggregate ownership of the outstanding shares of our common stock, at any meeting of stockholders at which directors are to be elected to the extent that the Oak Hill Funds do not have such proportionate number of director designees then serving on the Board of Directors; provided that for so long as the Oak Hill Funds (or one or more of their affiliates), individually or in the aggregate, own 5% or more of the voting power of the outstanding shares of our common stock, the Oak Hill Funds will be entitled to designate one director designee to serve on the Board of Directors at any meeting of stockholders at which directors are to be elected to the extent that the Oak Hill Funds do not have a director designee then serving on the Board of Directors.

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus includes statements that are, or may deemed to be, forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward looking terminology, including the terms “believes,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “will” or “should” or, in each case, their negative or other variations or comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in a number of places throughout this prospectus and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, growth, operating leverage strategies and the industry in which we operate.

By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. We caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus. In addition, even if results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus, those results or developments may not be indicative of results or developments in subsequent periods. As a result we caution you against relying on any forward-looking statement.

The following listing represents some, but not necessarily all, of the factors that may cause actual results to differ from those anticipated or predicted:

 

  Ÿ  

the impact of the global economic crisis on our business and financial results;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to open new stores and operate them profitably;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to achieve our targeted cash-on-cash return, first year store revenues, net development costs or Store-level EBITDA margin for new store openings;

 

  Ÿ  

changes in consumer preferences, general economic conditions or consumer discretionary spending;

 

  Ÿ  

the effect of competition in our industry;

 

  Ÿ  

potential fluctuations in our quarterly operating results due to seasonality and other factors;

 

  Ÿ  

the impact of potential fluctuations in the availability and cost of food and other supplies;

 

  Ÿ  

the impact of instances of food-borne illness and outbreaks of disease;

 

  Ÿ  

the impact of federal, state or local government regulations relating to our personnel or the sale of food or alcoholic beverages;

 

  Ÿ  

legislative or regulatory changes;

 

  Ÿ  

the continued service of key management personnel;

 

  Ÿ  

our ability to attract, motivate and retain qualified personnel;

 

  Ÿ  

the impact of litigation;

 

  Ÿ  

changes in accounting principles, policies or guidelines;

 

  Ÿ  

changes in general economic conditions or conditions in securities markets or the banking industry;

 

  Ÿ  

a materially adverse change in our financial condition;

 

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  Ÿ  

adverse local conditions, events, terrorist attacks, weather and natural disasters; and

 

  Ÿ  

other economic, competitive, governmental, regulatory, geopolitical and technological factors affecting operations, pricing and services.

You should also read carefully the factors described in the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus to better understand the risks and uncertainties inherent in our business and underlying any forward-looking statements.

Any forward-looking statements that we make in this prospectus speak only as of the date of such statements, and we undertake no obligation to update such statements. Comparisons of results for current and any prior periods are not intended to express any future trends or indications of future performance, unless expressed as such, and should only be viewed as historical data.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds to us from our sale of             shares of our common stock in this offering will be $             million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated expenses payable by us in connection with this offering. This assumes a public offering price of $             per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus. We intend to use approximately $             million of the proceeds to pay down a portion of our existing indebtedness, which may include the existing senior notes, the existing discount notes and the term loan portion of our senior secured credit facility, and approximately $             million of the proceeds to pay fees and expenses associated with the offering. The indebtedness being repaid accrues interest at the rate of             % and matures on             . We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of up to              shares of our common stock by the selling stockholders, if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares from the selling stockholders.

A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $             per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering by $             million, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated expenses payable by us.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have not historically declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock. After this offering, we intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings to reduce debt and fund the development and growth of our business, and we do not anticipate paying any dividends on our common stock. However, in the future, subject to the factors described below and our future liquidity and capitalization, we may change this policy and choose to pay dividends. Our ability to pay dividends on our common stock is currently restricted directly or indirectly by the terms of our senior secured credit facilities, the indentures governing the existing discount notes and the existing senior notes and our other indebtedness and may be further restricted by any future indebtedness we incur. Our business is conducted through our principal operating subsidiary, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. Dividends from, and cash generated by, Dave & Buster’s Inc. will be our principal sources of cash to repay indebtedness, fund operations and pay dividends. Accordingly, our ability to pay dividends to our stockholders is dependent on the earnings and distributions of funds from Dave & Buster’s, Inc.

Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will take into account:

 

  Ÿ  

restrictions in our senior secured credit facilities and the indentures governing the existing discount notes and the existing senior notes;

 

  Ÿ  

general economic and business conditions;

 

  Ÿ  

our financial condition and results of operations;

 

  Ÿ  

our capital requirements;

 

  Ÿ  

the ability of Dave & Busters, Inc. to pay dividends and make distributions to us; and

 

  Ÿ  

such other factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant.

See “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations .”

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our consolidated capitalization as of January 29, 2012:

 

  Ÿ  

on an actual basis reflecting the capitalization of Dave & Buster’s; and

 

  Ÿ  

and on an as adjusted basis to give effect to (1) this offering and the use of proceeds therefrom as if it had occurred on January 29, 2012; (2) a              for 1 stock split of our common stock prior to the consummation of this offering; and (3) our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, which will be in effect prior to the consummation of this offering; and assumes (1) no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase up to              additional shares from the selling stockholders; and (2) an initial public offering price of $         per share, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus.

This table should be read in conjunction with “ Use of Proceeds ,” “ Selected Consolidated Financial Data ,” “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ” and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included in this prospectus.

 

     As of January 29, 2012  

(Dollars in thousands)

   Actual     As
Adjusted
 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 33,684      $     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Debt(1):

    

Senior secured credit facility:

    

Revolving credit facility(2)

     —       

Term loan, net of unamortized discount

     146,667     

Existing senior notes

     200,000     

Existing discount notes, net of unamortized discount

     111,830     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total debt

     458,497     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 500,000 shares authorized and 148,610 shares issued on an actual basis;                  shares authorized and                  shares issued on an as adjusted basis

     1     

Preferred stock, none authorized and issued on an actual basis;                  shares authorized and none issued on an as adjusted basis

     —       

Paid-in capital

     150,608     

Treasury stock, 1,104 shares

     (1,189  

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     237     

Accumulated deficit

     (12,142  
  

 

 

   

Total stockholders’ equity

     137,515     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total capitalization

   $ 596,012      $                
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) This presentation shows amounts that are net of original issue discount.
(2) As of January 29, 2012, there were no outstanding borrowings under the revolving credit facility. $45,106 was available for borrowing after taking into account $4,894 of outstanding letters of credit.

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock in this offering, your ownership interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per share and the as adjusted net tangible book value per share of our common stock upon the completion of this offering.

As of January 29, 2012, our book value was $137.5 million or $932.27 per share and our net tangible book value was approximately $(222.7) million, or $(1,509.97) per share. Our net tangible book value per share represents the amount of our total tangible assets less total liabilities, divided by the total number of shares of common stock outstanding as of January 29, 2012. Dilution in net tangible book value per share represents the difference between the amount per share paid by purchasers of common stock in this offering and the as adjusted net tangible book value per share of common stock immediately after the completion of this offering.

After giving effect to (1) the sale of our common stock at an assumed initial public offering price of $            per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, and (2) the application of the net proceeds from this offering as described in “ Use of Proceeds ,” our as adjusted net tangible book value as of January 29, 2012 would have been approximately $             million, or $             per share.

This represents an immediate increase in net tangible book value of $             per share to our existing stockholders and an immediate dilution in net tangible book value of $             per share to new investors purchasing shares of our common stock in this offering at the initial public offering price.

The following table illustrates the dilution to new investors on a per share basis:

 

Assumed initial public offering price per share...

   $                

Net tangible book value per share as of January 29, 2012

  

Increase in net tangible book value per share attributable to the sale of shares in this offering

  

Increase in net tangible book value per share attributable to the issuance of restricted stock

  

As adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering

  
  

 

 

 

Dilution per share to new investors

   $     
  

 

 

 

A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $             per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) our as adjusted net tangible book value after this offering by $             million and increase (decrease) the dilution to new investors by $             per share, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

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Index to Financial Statements

The following table summarizes, as of January 29, 2012, the total number of shares of our common stock we issued and sold, the total consideration we received and the average price per share paid to us by our existing stockholders and to be paid by new investors purchasing shares of our common stock in this offering. The table is based on the initial public offering price of $             per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus), before underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us:

 

     Shares purchased     Total consideration
(in thousands)
    Average
Price

Per Share
 
     Number      Percent     Amount      Percent    

Existing stockholders

     147,506                $ 147,588                $ 1,001   

New investors

            

Total

        100        100  

A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $             per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) the total consideration paid by new investors by $             million and the total consideration paid by all stockholders by $             million.

The number of shares held by the existing stockholders will be reduced to the extent the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares. If the underwriters fully exercise their option, the existing stockholders will own a total of              shares, or approximately     % of our total outstanding shares.

In addition, we may choose to raise additional capital due to market conditions or strategic considerations even if we believe we have sufficient funds for our current or future operating plans. To the extent that additional capital is raised through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, or option grants are made to employees, the issuance of such securities could result in further dilution to our stockholders.

 

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Index to Financial Statements

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States require operating results for D&B Holdings prior to the Acquisition completed June 1, 2010 to be presented as the results of the Predecessor in the historical financial statements. Operating results of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. subsequent to the Acquisition are presented as the results of the Successor and include all periods including and subsequent to June 1, 2010.

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. has no material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of D&B Holdings. D&B Holdings has no other material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of Dave & Buster’s, Inc.

The statement of operations and cash flows data for each of the fiscal year ended January 29, 2012 (Successor) and the 244 day period from June 1, 2010 to January 30, 2011 (Successor) and the balance sheet data as of January 29, 2012 (Successor) and January 30, 2011 (Successor) were derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The statement of operations and cash flows data for each of the 120 day period from February 1, 2010 to May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and the balance sheet data as of January 31, 2010 (Predecessor) were derived from the Predecessor’s audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The statement of operations and cash flows data for each of the fiscal years ended February 1, 2009 (Predecessor) and February 3, 2008 (Predecessor) were derived from the Predecessor’s audited consolidated financial statements, which are not included in this prospectus. The balance sheet data as of January 31, 2010 (Predecessor), February 1, 2009 (Predecessor) and February 3, 2008 (Predecessor) were derived from the Predecessor’s audited consolidated financial statements, which are not included in this prospectus.

This table should be read in conjunction with “ Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ,” our historical consolidated financial statements and the historical consolidated financial statements of the Predecessor and the notes related thereto, included elsewhere in this prospectus. All dollar amounts are presented in thousands except per share amounts.

 

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Index to Financial Statements
    Fiscal Year Ended
January 29, 2012
    For the
244 Day
Period from
June 1, 2010
to January 30,
2011
          For the
120 Day
Period from
February 1,
2010 to May  31,
2010
    Fiscal Year Ended  
          January 30,
2011(1)
    January 31,
2010
    February 1,
2009
    February 3,
2008
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)     (Predecessor)     (Predecessor)  
                            (Non-GAAP)                    

Statement of operations data:

                 

Revenues:

                 

Food and beverage revenues

  $ 272,606      $ 177,044          $ 90,470      $ 267,514      $ 269,973      $ 284,779      $ 293,097   

Amusement and other revenues

    268,939        166,489            87,536        254,025        250,810        248,579        243,175   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

  $ 541,545      $ 343,533          $ 178,006      $ 521,539      $ 520,783      $ 533,358      $ 536,272   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating costs:

                 

Cost of products:

                 

Cost of food and beverage

  $ 65,751      $ 41,890          $ 21,817      $ 63,707      $ 65,349      $ 70,520      $ 72,493   

Cost of amusement and other

    41,417        26,832            13,442        40,274        38,788        34,218        34,252   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost of products

    107,168        68,722            35,259        103,981        104,137        104,738        106,745   

Operating payroll and benefits

    130,875        85,271            43,969        129,240        132,114        139,508        144,920   

Other store operating expenses

    175,993        111,456            59,802        171,258        174,685        174,179        171,627   

General & administrative expenses(2)

    34,896        25,670            17,064        42,734        30,437        34,546        38,999   

Depreciation & amortization expense

    54,277        33,794            16,224        50,018        53,658        49,652        51,898   

Pre-opening costs

    4,186        842            1,447        2,289        3,881        2,988        1,002   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating costs

    507,395        325,755            173,765        499,520        498,912        505,611        515,191   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

    34,150        17,778            4,241        22,019        21,871        27,747        21,081   

Interest expense, net

    44,931        25,486            6,976        32,462        22,122        26,177        31,183   
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (10,781     (7,708         (2,735     (10,443     (251     1,570        (10,102

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (3,796     (2,551         (597     (3,148     99        (45     (1,261
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ (6,985   $ (5,157       $ (2,138   $ (7,295   $ (350   $ 1,615      $ (8,841
 

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss) per share of common stock:

                 

Basic

  $ (45.58   $ (21.07         *        *        *        *        *   

Diluted

  $ (45.58   $ (21.07         *        *        *        *        *   
 

Weighted average number of shares outstanding:

                 

Basic

    153,250        244,748            *        *        *        *        *   

Diluted

    153,250        244,748            *        *        *        *        *   
 

As Adjusted Consolidated Statements of Operations
Data (3):

                 
 

As Adjusted net income

                 
 

As Adjusted earnings per share:

                 

Basic

                 

Dilutive

                 
 

As Adjusted weighted average shares outstanding:

                 

Basic

                 

Dilutive

                 

 

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    Fiscal Year Ended
January 29, 2012
    For the
244 Day
Period from
June 1, 2010
to January 30,
2011
          For the
120 Day
Period from
February 1,
2010 to May  31,
2010
    Fiscal Year Ended  
          January 30,
2011(1)
    January 31,
2010
    February 1,
2009
    February 3,
2008
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)     (Predecessor)     (Predecessor)  
                            (Non-GAAP)                    
 

Statement of cash flow data:

                 

Cash provided by (used in):

                 

Operating activities

  $ 72,777      $ 25,240          $ 11,295      $ 36,535      $ 59,054      $ 52,197      $ 50,573   

Investing activities

    (70,502     (102,744         (12,975     (115,719     (48,406     (49,084     (30,899

Financing activities

    (2,998     97,034            (125     96,909        (2,500     (13,625     (11,000
 

Balance sheet data (as of end of period):

                 

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 33,684      $ 34,407              $ 16,682      $ 8,534      $ 19,046   

Working capital (deficit)(4)

    (6,313     (5,186             (33,922     (40,118     (34,984

Property & equipment, net

    323,342        304,819                294,151        296,805        296,974   

Total assets

    786,142        764,542                483,640        480,936        496,203   

Total debt, net of unamortized discount

    458,497        347,918                227,250        229,750        243,375   

Stockholders’ equity

    137,515        239,830                92,646        92,023        90,756   

 

* Not meaningful.
(1) Affiliates of the Oak Hill Funds acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of Dave & Buster’s Holdings, Inc. as part of the Acquisition. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States require operating results for the Company prior to the June 1, 2010 acquisition to be presented as Predecessor’s results in the historical financial statements. Operating results for the Company subsequent to the June 1, 2010 acquisition are presented or referred to as Successor’s results in our historical financial statements. References to the 52 week period ended January 30, 2011, included in this prospectus relate to the combined 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 of the Successor and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 of the Predecessor. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year.
(2) General and administrative expenses during the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011 includes $4,638 and $4,280 of transaction costs in the Successor and Predecessor periods, respectively. The Predecessor period of fiscal 2010 also includes $1,378 acceleration of stock-based compensation charges related to the Predecessor’s Stock plan.
(3) The as adjusted consolidated statement of operations data give effect to the receipt and application of $             proceeds to us from this offering as described in “Use of Proceeds”, as if it had occurred as of January 29, 2012. The as adjusted consolidated statement of operations data is not necessarily indicative of what our results of operations would have been if the transaction had been completed as of the date indicated, nor is such data necessarily indicative of our results of operations for any future period.
(4) Defined as total current assets minus total current liabilities.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with the audited consolidated financial statements, and related notes included herein. Unless otherwise specified, the meanings of all defined terms in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) are consistent with the meanings of such terms as defined in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. This discussion includes forward-looking statements and assumptions. Please see “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for a discussion of the risks, uncertainties and assumptions relating to our forward-looking statements. We define high-volume dining and entertainment venues as those open for at least one full year and with average store revenues in excess of $5,000 and define year one cash-on-cash return as year one Store-level EBITDA exclusive of national marketing costs divided by net development costs. All dollar amounts are presented in thousands.

General

We are a leading owner and operator of high-volume venues that combine dining and entertainment in North America for both adults and families. Founded in 1982, the core of our concept is to offer our guests the opportunity to “ Eat Drink Play ” all in one location. We believe we are currently the largest national chain offering a full menu of casual dining food items and a full selection of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverage items together with an extensive assortment of entertainment attractions, including skill and sports-oriented redemption games, video games, interactive simulators and other traditional games. Unlike the strategy of many restaurants of shortening visit times by focusing on turning tables faster, we aim to increase the length of stay in our locations to generate incremental revenues and improve the guest’s experience. While our guests are primarily a balanced mix of men and women aged 21 to 39, we believe we are also an attractive venue for families with children and teenagers. As of April 15, 2012, we owned and operated 59 stores in 25 states and Canada. In addition, there is one franchised store operating in Canada. The formats of our stores are flexible, which allows us to size each store appropriately for each market in which we compete. Our stores average 47,000 square feet, range in size between 16,000 and 66,000 square feet and are open seven days a week. For the year ended January 29, 2012, we generated total revenues, Adjusted EBITDA and net loss of $541,545, $98,372 and $6,985, respectively. For fiscal 2010 (combined), we had total revenues of $521,539, Adjusted EBITDA of $86,280 and net loss of $7,295.

We believe we have an attractive store economic model that enables us to generate what we believe to be high average store revenues and Store-level EBITDA. For comparable stores in fiscal 2011, our average revenues per store were $9,770, average Store-level EBITDA was $2,346 and average Store-level EBITDA margin was 24%. During fiscal 2011, 49 of our then 52 existing comparable stores qualified as high volume under our definition. Furthermore, for that same period, all of our Dave & Buster’s comparable stores had positive Store-level EBITDA, with over 85% of our stores generating more than $1,000 of Store-level EBITDA each. After allocating corporate general and administrative expenses, our Adjusted EBITDA margin was 18.2% for fiscal 2011. Store-level and Adjusted EBITDA exclude a number of significant items, including our interest expense and depreciation and amortization expense. A key feature of our business model is that approximately 50% of our total revenues for fiscal 2011 were from our entertainment offerings, which have a relatively low variable cost component (consisting primarily of “Winner’s Circle” redemption items) and contributed a gross margin of 85% for the period.

 

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Corporate History

Overview

In 1982, David “Dave” Corriveau and James “Buster” Corley founded Dave & Buster’s under the belief that there was consumer demand for a combined experience of entertainment, food and drinks. We opened our first store in Dallas, Texas, in 1982 and since then we have expanded our portfolio nationally to 59 company-owned stores across 25 states and Canada.

From 1997 to early 2006, we operated as a public company under the leadership of Dave and Buster. In March 2006, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. was acquired by Dave & Buster’s Holdings, Inc. (“D&B Holdings”), a holding company controlled by affiliates of Wellspring Capital Partners III, L.P. (“Wellspring”) and HBK Main Street Investors L.P. (“HBK”). In connection with the acquisition of Dave & Buster’s, Inc. by Wellspring and HBK, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. common stock was delisted from the New York Stock Exchange. In addition, in 2006 we hired our current management team led by our Chief Executive Officer, Stephen King.

On June 1, 2010, Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. (formerly known as Dave & Buster’s Parent, Inc. and originally named Games Acquisition Corp.), a newly-formed Delaware corporation owned by Oak Hill Capital Partners III, L.P. and Oak Hill Capital Management Partners III, L.P. (collectively, the “Oak Hill Funds” and together with their manager, Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC, and its related funds, “Oak Hill Capital Partners”) acquired all of the outstanding common stock (the “Acquisition”) of D&B Holdings from Wellspring and HBK. In connection therewith, Games Merger Corp., a newly-formed Missouri corporation and an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc., merged (the “Merger”) with and into D&B Holdings’ wholly- owned, direct subsidiary, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. (with Dave & Buster’s, Inc. being the surviving corporation in the Merger). As a result of the Acquisition and certain post-acquisition activity, the Oak Hill Funds indirectly control approximately 95.4% of our outstanding common stock and have the right to appoint certain members of our Board of Directors, and certain members of our Board of Directors and management control approximately 4.6% of our outstanding common stock. Upon completion of this offering, the Oak Hill Funds will beneficially own approximately     % of our outstanding common stock, or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management will beneficially own approximately     % of our common stock or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full. The Oak Hill Funds and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management who are party to a stockholders agreement will continue to own a majority of the voting power of our outstanding common stock. As a result, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of the NYSE and NASDAQ. See “Principal Stockholders.”

Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. has no other material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of D&B Holdings. D&B Holdings has no other material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of Dave & Buster’s, Inc. As such, the following discussion, unless specifically identified otherwise, addresses the operations of Dave & Buster’s, Inc.

Acquisition of Dave & Buster’s Holdings, Inc.

On the closing date of the Acquisition the following events occurred:

 

  Ÿ  

All outstanding shares of D&B Holdings’ common stock were converted into the right to receive the per share acquisition consideration;

 

  Ÿ  

All vested options to acquire D&B Holdings’ common stock were converted into the right to receive an amount in cash equal to the difference between the per share exercise price and the per share acquisition consideration without interest;

 

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  Ÿ  

Dave & Buster’s, Inc. retired all outstanding debt and accrued interest related to its senior secured credit facility and senior notes;

 

  Ÿ  

Dave & Buster’s, Inc. issued $200,000 of 11% senior notes due 2018 (the “existing senior notes”);

 

  Ÿ  

Dave & Buster’s, Inc. entered into a senior secured credit facility which provides for senior secured financing of up to $200,000 consisting of:

 

  Ÿ  

a $150,000 term loan facility with a maturity on June 1, 2016, and

 

  Ÿ  

a $50,000 revolving credit facility, including a sub-facility of up to the U.S. dollar equivalent of $1,000 for borrowings in Canadian dollars by our Canadian subsidiary, a letter of credit sub-facility, and a swingline sub-facility, with a maturity on June 1, 2015.

The Acquisition resulted in the newly formed Dave & Buster’s Parent, Inc. (now known as Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc.) and a change in ownership of 100% of D&B Holdings and Dave & Buster’s, Inc.’s outstanding common stock. The purchase price paid in the Acquisition has been “pushed down” to Dave & Buster’s, Inc.’s financial statements and is allocated to record the acquired assets and liabilities assumed based on their fair value. The Acquisition and the allocation of the purchase price to the assets and liabilities as of June 1, 2010, have been recorded based on internal assessments and third party valuation studies.

The aggregate purchase price was $595,998 in cash and newly issued debt, as described above. The following table represents the allocation of the acquisition costs, including professional fees and other related costs, to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, based on their fair values:

 

At June 1, 2010

      

Purchase price:

  

Cash, including acquisition costs

   $ 245,498   

Debt, including debt issuance costs, net of discount

     350,500   
  

 

 

 

Total consideration

     595,998   

Acquisition related costs, including debt issuance costs:

  

Included in general and administrative expenses for the fifty-two weeks ended January 30, 2011

     8,918   

Included in interest expense for the fifty-two weeks ended January 30, 2011

     3,000   

Included in other long-term assets (debt issuance costs)

     12,591   
  

 

 

 

Total acquisition related costs

     24,509   

Allocation of purchase price:

  

Current assets, including cash and cash equivalents of $19,718 and a current deferred tax asset of $16,073

     71,287   

Property and equipment

     315,914   

Trade name

     79,000   

Other assets and deferred charges, including definite lived intangibles of $10,700

     37,702   

Goodwill

     272,359   
  

 

 

 

Total assets acquired

     776,262   

Current liabilities

     64,958   

Deferred occupancy costs

     65,521   

Deferred income taxes

     36,928   

Other liabilities

     12,857   
  

 

 

 

Total liabilities assumed

     180,264   

Net assets acquired, before debt

     595,998   

Newly issued long-term debt, net of discount

     350,500   
  

 

 

 

Net assets acquired

   $ 245,498   
  

 

 

 

 

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The following table presents the allocation of the intangible assets subject to amortization:

 

     Amount      Weighted
Avg.
Amortization
Years
 

Trademarks

   $ 8,500         7.0   

Non-compete agreements

     500         2.0   

Guest relationships

     1,700         9.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total intangible assets subject to amortization

   $ 10,700         7.1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The goodwill of $272,359 arising from the Acquisition is largely attributable to the future expected cash flows and growth potential of Dave & Buster’s, Inc. As the Company does not have more than one operating segment, allocation of goodwill between segments is not required. A portion of the trademarks are deductible for tax purposes. No other intangibles, including goodwill, are deductible for tax purposes.

Post-Acquisition Equity Activity

On September 30, 2010, we repurchased one thousand five hundred shares of our common stock from a former member of management for $1,500, of which $500 was paid in fiscal 2010 and $1,000 was paid in fiscal 2011. As described below, we subsequently resold approximately seventy-five and eight hundred thirty-three of the purchased shares on March 23, 2011 and January 18, 2012, respectively. We continue to retain approximately five hundred ninety-two of the purchased shares as treasury stock.

On February 22, 2011, we issued $180,790 aggregate principal amount at maturity of 12.25% senior discount notes (the “existing discount notes”). The notes will mature on February 15, 2016. No cash interest will accrue on the notes prior to maturity. We received net proceeds of $100,000, which we used to pay debt issuance costs and to repurchase a portion of our outstanding common stock from certain of our stockholders. We did not retain any proceeds from the note issuance. Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. is the sole obligor of the notes. Neither D&B Holdings, Dave & Buster’s, Inc. nor any of their subsidiaries are guarantors of these notes.

On March 23, 2011, we sold to a member of management seventy-five shares of our common stock held as treasury stock for an aggregate sale price equal to $75, the value based on an independent third party valuation prepared as of January 30, 2011.

On June 28, 2011, we purchased approximately ninety shares of our common stock from a former member of management for approximately $90. The purchased shares are being retained as treasury stock by the Company.

On January 13, 2012, we purchased approximately four hundred twenty-two shares of our common stock from a former member of management for approximately $507. The purchased shares are being retained as treasury stock by the Company.

On January 18, 2012, we sold approximately eight hundred thirty-three shares of our common stock held as treasury stock to three outside directors for an aggregate price of approximately $1,000. Proceeds from the sale were used to repay funds that had been advanced to us by Dave & Buster’s, Inc. The per share sales price approximates the value per share as determined by an independent third party valuation prepared as of October 30, 2011.

Upon completion of this offering, the Oak Hill Funds will beneficially own approximately     % of our outstanding common stock, or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional

 

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shares in full, and certain members of our Board of Directors and our management will beneficially own approximately     % of our common stock, or     % if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full.

Expense Reimbursement Agreement

We entered into an expense reimbursement agreement with Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC, concurrently with the consummation of the Acquisition. Pursuant to this agreement, Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC provides general advice to us in connection with our long-term strategic plans, financial management, strategic transactions and other business matters. The expense reimbursement agreement provides for the reimbursement of certain expenses of Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC. The initial term of the expense reimbursement agreement expires in June 2015, and after that date such agreement will renew automatically on a year-to-year basis unless one party gives at least 30 days’ prior notice of its intention not to renew. Upon the consummation of an initial public offering (including this offering), the expense reimbursement agreement will automatically terminate. However, Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC will continue to be reimbursed for providing us with financial, investment banking and other advisory services pursuant to the amended and restated stockholders’ agreement.

Presentation of Operating Results

Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States require operating results of D&B Holdings prior to the June 1, 2010, Acquisition to be presented as the Predecessor’s results in the historical financial statements. Operating results of Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. subsequent to the Acquisition are presented as the Successor’s results and include all periods including and subsequent to June 1, 2010. There have been no changes in the business operations of the Company due to the Acquisition.

Our fiscal year ends on the Sunday after the Saturday closest to January 31. All references to the year-to-date fiscal 2011 relate to the fifty-two week period ended January 29, 2012, of the Successor. All references to fiscal 2010 relate to the combined 244 day period ended January 30, 2011, of the Successor and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010, of the Predecessor. All references to fiscal 2009 relate to the fifty-two weeks ended January 31, 2010, of the Predecessor. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year.

As of January 29, 2012, Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. had no material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of D&B Holdings. For the same period, D&B Holdings had no other material assets or operations other than 100% ownership of the outstanding common stock of Dave & Buster’s, Inc. As such, our discussions, unless specifically identified otherwise, addresses the operations of Dave & Buster’s, Inc.

Overview

We monitor and analyze a number of key performance measures in order to manage our business and evaluate financial and operating performance. These measures include:

Revenues .     Revenues consist of food and beverage revenues as well as amusement and other revenues. Beverage revenues refers to alcoholic beverages. For the year ended January 29, 2012, we

 

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derived 35.1% of our total revenue from food sales, 15.2% from beverage sales, 48.8% from amusement sales and 0.9% from other sources. In fiscal 2010, we derived 35.7% of our total revenue from food sales, 15.6% from beverage sales, 47.7% from amusement sales and 1.0% from other sources. Our revenues are primarily influenced by the number of stores in operation and comparable store revenue. Comparable store revenue growth reflects the change in year-over-year revenue for the comparable store base and is an important measure of store performance. We define the comparable store base to include those stores open for a full 18 months as of the beginning of each fiscal period. Percentage changes have been calculated based on an equivalent number of weeks in both the current and comparison periods. Comparable store sales growth can be generated by an increase in guest traffic counts or by increases in average dollars spent per guest.

Cost of Products.     Cost of products includes the cost of food, beverages and the “Winner’s Circle” redemption items. For the fiscal year ended January 29, 2012, the cost of food products averaged 24.4% of food revenue and the cost of beverage products averaged 23.5% of beverage revenue. The amusement and other cost of products averaged 15.4% of amusement and other revenues. During fiscal 2010, the cost of food products averaged 23.9% of food revenue and the cost of beverage products averaged 23.6% of beverage revenue. The amusement and other cost of products averaged 15.9% of amusement and other revenues. The cost of products is driven by product mix and pricing movements from third-party suppliers. We continually strive to gain efficiencies in both the acquisition and use of products while maintaining high standards of product quality.

Operating Payroll and Benefits .    Operating payroll and benefits consist of wages, employer taxes and benefits for store personnel. We continually review the opportunity for efficiencies principally through scheduling refinements.

Other Store Operating Expenses.     Other store operating expenses consist primarily of store-related occupancy, supply and outside service expenses, utilities, repair and maintenance and marketing and promotional costs.

Store-level Variability, Quarterly Fluctuations, Seasonality, and Inflation.     We have historically operated stores varying in size and have experienced significant variability among stores in volumes, operating results and net investment costs. Our new locations typically open with sales volumes in excess of their run-rate levels, which we refer to as a “honeymoon” effect. We expect our new store volumes and margins to be lower in the second full year of operations than in their first full year of operations, and to grow in line with the rest of our comparable store base thereafter. As a result of the substantial revenues associated with each new store, the timing of new store openings will result in significant fluctuations in quarterly results.

We also expect seasonality to be a factor in the operation or results of the business in the future with higher first and fourth quarter revenues associated with the spring and year-end holidays. These quarters will continue to be susceptible to the impact of severe weather on guest traffic and sales during that period. Our third quarter, which encompasses the end of the summer vacation season, has historically had lower revenues as compared to the other quarters.

We expect that volatile economic conditions will continue to exert pressure on both supplier pricing and consumer spending related to entertainment and dining alternatives. Although there is no assurance that our cost of products will remain stable or that federal or state minimum wage rates will not increase beyond amounts currently legislated, the effects of any supplier price increases or minimum wage rate increases are expected to be partially offset by selected menu price increases where competitively appropriate.

 

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Charges in Connection With This Offering and Related Transactions

Following this offering, we expect to incur a number of other one-time charges in connection with the transactions contemplated by this prospectus that will adversely affect our results of operations. For example, if we fully repaid the existing discount notes, we currently estimate that we will incur charges aggregating approximately $             representing the payment of $             of premiums and expenses in connection with the reduction of our aggregate indebtedness by approximately $            .

Following this offering, we may incur a charge related to the compensation expense associated with the vesting of the options held by certain members of our management and directors. This vesting may occur in connection with the consummation of this offering or with a modification of the terms of the existing stock-based compensation arrangements.

Results of Operations

The table below sets forth selected data in thousands of dollars and as a percentage of total revenues (unless otherwise noted) for the periods indicated. All information is derived from the consolidated statements of operations included in this prospectus.

We have prepared our discussions of the Successor’s fiscal year 2011 results of operations and cash flows through comparison to the pro forma and combined results of operations and cash flows of the Predecessor and Successor fifty-two week period ended January 30, 2011. Similarly, we have prepared our discussion of the fiscal 2010 results of operations by combining the Predecessor and Successor results of operations and cash flows during the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011, and comparing the combined data to the results of operations and cash flows for fiscal year ended January 31, 2010. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year.

 

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                                  Fiscal Year Ended  
    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 29,
2012
    244 Day
Period from
June 1, 2010
to
January 30, 2011
          120 Day
Period from
February 1,
2010 to
May 31, 2010
    January 30,
2011
    January 30,
2011
    January 31,
2010
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)           (Predecessor)     (Combined)     (Proforma)(1)     (Predecessor)  
                                  (Non-GAAP)              

Food and beverage revenues

  $ 272,606        50.3   $ 177,044        51.5       $ 90,470        50.8   $ 267,514        51.3   $ 267,514        51.3   $ 269,973        51.8

Amusement and other revenues

    268,939        49.7        166,489        48.5            87,536        49.2        254,025        48.7        254,025        48.7        250,810        48.2   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

  $ 541,545        100.0   $ 343,533        100.0       $ 178,006        100.0   $ 521,539        100.0   $ 521,539        100.0   $ 520,783        100.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cost of food and beverage

  $ 65,751        24.1   $ 41,890        23.7       $ 21,817        24.1   $ 63,707        23.8   $ 63,707        23.8   $ 65,349        24.2

Cost of amusement and other

    41,417        15.4        26,832        16.1            13,442        15.4        40,274        15.9        40,274        15.9        38,788        15.5   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost of products

    107,168        19.8        68,722        20.0            35,259        19.8        103,981        19.9        103,981        19.9        104,137        20.0   

Operating payroll and benefits

    130,875        24.2        85,271        24.8            43,969        24.7        129,240        24.8        129,240        24.8        132,114        25.4   

Other store operating expenses

    175,993        32.5        111,456        32.5            59,802        33.6        171,258        32.9        171,929        33.0        174,685        33.6   

General & administrative expenses(2)

    34,896        6.4        25,670        7.5            17,064        9.6        42,734        8.2        32,787        6.3        30,437        5.8   

Depreciation & amortization expense

    54,277        10.0        33,794        9.8            16,224        9.1        50,018        9.6        51,043        9.8        53,658        10.3   

Pre-opening costs

    4,186        0.8        842        0.2            1,447        0.8        2,289        0.4        2,289        .4        3,881        0.7   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating costs

    507,395        93.7        325,755        94.8            173,765        97.6        499,520        95.8        491,269        94.2        498,912        95.8   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

    34,150        6.3        17,778        5.2            4,241        2.4        22,019        4.2        30,270        5.8        21,871        4.2   

Interest expense, net

    44,931        8.3        25,486        7.4            6,976        3.9        32,462        6.2        33,202        6.4        22,122        4.2   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (10,781     (2.0     (7,708     (2.2         (2,735     (1.5     (10,443     (2.0     (2,932     (.6     (251     (0.0

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

    (3,796     (0.7     (2,551     (0.7         (597     (0.3     (3,148     (0.6     (884     (.2     99        0.0   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (6,985     (1.3 )%    $ (5,157     (1.5 )%        $ (2,138     (1.2 )%    $ (7,295     (1.4 )%      (2,048     (0.4 )%    $ (350     (0.0 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Statement of cash flow data:

                           

Cash provided by (used in):

                           

Operating activities

  $ 72,777        $ 25,240            $ 11,295        $ 36,535            $ 59,054     

Investing activities

    (70,502       (102,744           (12,975       (115,719           (48,406  

Financing activities

    (2,998       97,034              (125       96,909              (2,500  

Change in comparable store sales(3)

    2.2                   (1.9 )%            (7.8 )%   

Stores open at end of period(4)

    59                      58              56     

Comparable stores open at end of period(3)

    52                      48              47     

 

(1) The supplemental unaudited pro forma statement of operations for the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011, gives effect to the Acquisition and related transactions as if such transactions took place on February 1, 2010. This unaudited pro forma information should not be relied upon as necessarily being indicative of the historical results that would have been obtained if the Acquisition had actually occurred on that date, nor the results that may be obtained in the future. Pro forma amounts reflect additional expenses incurred had the Acquisition occurred at the time as indicated above, and consist primarily of interest, depreciation and amortization, and income tax expense. Additionally, pro forma amounts exclude certain transaction related expenses and the associated income tax benefits. The unaudited pro forma statement of operations was prepared in accordance with Rule 11-02 of Regulation S-X as promulgated by the SEC. See “Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Information”.
(2) General and administrative expenses during the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011 includes $4,638 and $4,280 of transaction costs in the Successor and Predecessor periods, respectively. The Predecessor period of fiscal 2010 also includes $1,378 acceleration of stock-based compensation charges related to the Predecessor’s Stock plan.
(3) “Comparable store sales” (year-over-year comparison of stores open at least 18 months as of the beginning of each of the fiscal years) is a key performance indicator used within the industry and is indicative of acceptance of our initiatives as well as local economic and consumer trends.

 

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(4) The number of stores open includes one franchise location in Canada and our location in Nashville, Tennessee, which temporarily closed from May 2, 2010 to November 28, 2011 due to flooding. The number of stores open at January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010 includes one store in Dallas, Texas, which was permanently closed on May 2, 2011. Our new store openings during the last three fiscal years were as follows:

 

Fiscal Year Ended

January 29, 2012

 

Fiscal Year Ended

January 30, 2011

  

Fiscal Year Ended

January 31, 2010

Location

 

Opening Date

 

Location

 

Opening Date

  

Location

 

Opening Date

Orlando, FL

 

07/18/2011

 

Wauwatosa, WI

  03/01/2010    Richmond, VA   04/20/2009

Braintree, MA

 

12/07/2011

 

Roseville, CA

  05/03/2010    Indianapolis, IN   06/15/2009
         Niagara Falls, ON(a)   06/25/2009
         Columbus, OH   10/12/2009

 

(a) Franchise location.

Fiscal 2011 Compared to Fiscal 2010

Revenues

Total revenues were $541,545 for fiscal 2011, $343,533 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $178,006 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). The fiscal 2011 revenue mix was 50.3% food and beverage and 49.7% amusement and other. Revenue mix for the Successor period of fiscal 2010 was 51.5% food and beverage and 48.5% amusement and other, while during the Predecessor period of fiscal 2010 the mix was 50.8% food and beverage and 49.2% amusement and other. The following discussion of revenues has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Total revenues increased $20,006, or 3.8%, to $541,545 in fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma revenues of $521,539 in fiscal 2010.

The net increase in revenues were derived from the following sources:

 

Comparable stores

   $ 10,801   

Non comparable stores-operating

     12,025   

Non comparable stores- closure of store in Dallas, Texas

     (2,404

Other

     (416
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 20,006   
  

 

 

 

Comparable stores revenue increased by $10,801, or 2.2%, for fiscal 2011 compared to fiscal 2010. Comparable store special events revenues, which accounted for 12.9% of consolidated comparable stores revenue for fiscal 2011, increased $4,128, or 6.7%, compared to fiscal 2010. The walk-in component of our comparable store sales for fiscal 2011, increased by $6,673, or 1.5%, compared to fiscal 2010.

Sales grew in each component of our business, but the growth was led by amusements revenue. Comparable store amusements and other revenues increased by $9,664, or 4.0%, to $251,901 in fiscal 2011 from $242,237 in fiscal 2010. The growth in amusement sales was sparked primarily by local marketing efforts, improved server salesmanship, and strategic game puchases designed to increase the appeal and consumption of our amusement offerings.

Food sales at comparable stores increased by $1,026, or 0.6%, to $178,626 in fiscal 2011 from $177,600 in fiscal 2010. Beverage sales at comparable stores increased by $111, or 0.1%, to $77,494 in fiscal 2011 from $77,383 in fiscal 2010.

Non-comparable store revenues increased by a total of $9,621. Non-comparable store revenues includes the revenues associated with our last five store openings and the pre-closure revenues of our

 

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store located in Dallas, Texas, which closed on May 2, 2011. Revenues from our two fiscal 2011 store openings totaled $14,181, but were partially offset by the loss of revenues from the store closure mentioned above of $2,404.

Our revenue mix was 35.1% for food, 15.2% for beverage and 49.7% for amusement and other for fiscal 2011. This compares to 35.7%, 15.6% and 48.7%, respectively, for fiscal 2010.

Cost of products

The total cost of products was $107,168 for fiscal 2011, $68,722 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $35,259 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). The total cost of products as a percentage of total revenues was 19.8%, 20.0%, and 19.8% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. The following discussion of the cost of products has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Cost of food and beverage revenues increased to $65,751 for fiscal 2011, compared to the pro forma cost of food and beverage of $63,707 for fiscal 2010. Cost of food and beverage products, as a percent of food and beverage revenues, increased 30 basis points to 24.1% of revenues for fiscal 2011 compared to 23.8% of revenues for fiscal 2010. Increased cost pressure in most of our food categories was partially offset by reduced beverage product costs.

Cost of amusement and other revenues increased to $41,417 in fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma cost of amusement and other of $40,274 in fiscal 2010. The costs of amusement and other, as a percentage of amusement and other revenues, decreased as a percentage of amusement and other revenues, by 50 basis points to 15.4% of revenues in fiscal 2011 compared to 15.9% of revenues in fiscal 2010. This decrease is due primarily to lower costs of certain redemption items as a result of strategic sourcing initiatives, increases in the ticket redemption prices at our Winner’s Circle, and select game price increases.

Operating payroll and benefits

Operating payroll and benefits were $130,875 for fiscal 2011, $85,271 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $43,969 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). Operating payroll and benefits as a percentage of total revenues was 24.2%, 24.8% and 24.7% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. The decrease in percentage of revenues in fiscal 2011 compared to both the Successor and Predecessor periods of fiscal 2010 percentage of revenues was driven primarily by a continued focus on labor scheduling, efficiency improvement and favorable sales leverage in 2011. The following discussion of operating payroll and benefits has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Operating payroll and benefits increased by $1,635, or 1.3%, to $130,875 in fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma operating payroll and benefits of $129,240 in fiscal 2010. The total cost of operating payroll and benefits, as a percentage of total revenues, decreased 60 basis points to 24.2% of revenues for fiscal 2011 from 24.8% of revenues for fiscal 2010. This decrease in the percentage of revenues was primarily driven by the initiatives described above. In addition, benefit costs were lower in fiscal 2011, due, in part, to favorable health insurance claims experience.

Other store operating expenses

Other store operating expenses were $175,993 for fiscal 2011, $111,456 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $59,802 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010

 

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(Predecessor). Other store operating expenses as a percentage of total revenues were 32.5%, 32.5% and 33.6% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. Other store operating expenses in fiscal 2011 were reduced by the recognition of business interruption recoveries and gains from property related recoveries of $4,170 related to the Nashville store which reopened in November 2011. Additionally, other store operating expenses, as a percentage of total revenues, were favorably impacted during fiscal 2011 by lower estimated general liability and workers’ compensation claims related expenses. These expense reductions for fiscal 2011 were partially offset by the recognition of $200 in casualty losses and $300 impairment and closure charges related to a store located in Dallas, Texas, which closed on May 2, 2011, as well as an increase in occupancy expenses driven by new stores and an increase in promotional and marketing activity. Other store operating expenses in the Successor period of fiscal 2010 were favorably impacted by the recognition of $6,316 business interruption recoveries and gains from property related reimbursements stemming from the May 2010 closure of our Nashville location due to flooding. This favorable variance was partially offset by an increase in occupancy expenses driven by recognizing our leasehold rents at fair market value as required in purchase accounting. The following discussion of other store operating expenses has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Other store operating expenses increased by $4,064, or 2.4%, to $175,993 in fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma other store operating expenses of $171,929 in fiscal 2010. The other store operating expenses, as a percentage of total revenues, decreased by 50 basis points to 32.5% of revenues for fiscal 2011 from 33.0% of revenues for fiscal 2010. This decrease in other store operating expenses, as a percentage of revenues, was primarily driven by the factors described above.

General and administrative expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel, facilities, and professional expenses for the various departments of our corporate headquarters. General and administrative expenses were $34,896 for fiscal 2011, $25,670 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $17,064 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). General and administrative expenses as a percentage of total revenues were 6.4%, 7.5%, and 9.6% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. Higher general and administrative costs as a percentage of sales for both the Successor and Predecessor periods of fiscal 2010 includes professional fees incurred as a result of the Acquisition of $4,638 and $4,280, respectively. The Predecessor period of fiscal 2010 also includes $1,378 acceleration of stock-based compensation charges related to the Predecessor’s stock option plan. The following discussion of general and administrative expenses has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

General and administrative expenses increased by $2,109, or 6.4%, to $34,896 for fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma general and administrative expenses of $32,787 for fiscal 2010. The general and administrative expenses, as a percentage of total revenues, increased 10 basis points to 6.4% of revenues for fiscal 2011 from 6.3% of revenues for fiscal 2010. The increase is due to increased professional and consulting fees and development costs associated with the abandonment of potential future sites.

Depreciation and amortization expense

Depreciation and amortization expenses were $54,277 for fiscal 2011, $33,794 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $16,224 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). Depreciation and amortization expenses as a percentage of total revenues were 10.0%, 9.8% and 9.1% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and

 

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the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. Increase in depreciation expense as a percentage of total revenues in both Successor periods was driven by higher depreciation associated with the net increases in the fair value and changes in estimated useful lives of certain assets as a result of the Acquisition. New store openings also contributed to the increase in fiscal 2011 depreciation expense as a percentage of total revenues. The following discussion of depreciation and amortization expense has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Depreciation and amortization expense includes the depreciation of fixed assets and the amortization of trademarks with finite lives. Depreciation and amortization expense increased by $3,234, or 6.3%, to $54,277 for fiscal 2011, compared to the pro forma depreciation and amortization expense of $51,043 for fiscal 2010. This increase is primarily a result of higher depreciation associated with new store openings and maintenance capital expenditures, partially offset by the absence of depreciation related to assets located in our Dallas, Texas, location that were suspended due to the closure of our store and subsequent sale of the assets.

Pre-opening costs

Pre-opening costs were $4,186 for fiscal 2011, $842 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $1,447 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). Pre-opening costs as a percentage of total revenues were 0.8%, 0.2%, and 0.8% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. Pre-opening costs as a percentage of total revenues is dependent on the timing of a store opening and store size format. The following discussion of pre-opening costs has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Pre-opening costs include costs associated with the opening and organizing of new stores or conversion of existing stores, including pre-opening rent, staff-training and recruiting, and travel costs for employees engaged in such pre-opening activities. Pre-opening costs increased by $1,897 to $4,186 in fiscal 2011, compared to the pro forma pre-opening costs of $2,289 for fiscal 2010 due to the timing of new store openings. During fiscal 2011, our pre-opening costs consisted primarily of expenses incurred in connection with our store in Orlando, Florida, which opened for business on July 18, 2011, and our store in Braintree (Boston), Massachusetts, which opened for business on December 7, 2011. We also incurred expenses relating to our site in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, which subsequently opened on January 30, 2012. During fiscal 2010, our pre-opening costs were primarily attributable to two new stores in Wauwatosa (Milwaukee), Wisconsin and Roseville (Sacramento), California, which opened for business on March 1, 2010, and May 3, 2010, respectively, and costs associated with the future site in Orlando, Florida.

Interest expense

Total net interest expense was $44,931 for fiscal 2011, $25,486 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and $6,976 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). Net interest expense as a percentage of total revenues was 8.3%, 7.4%, and 3.9% for fiscal 2011, the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), respectively. The increase in interest expense as a percentage of total revenues in the two Successor periods is driven primarily by increased debt levels as a result of the Acquisition and higher debt cost amortization resulting from the new debt structure. The negative impact of higher debt levels on the two Successor periods interest expense was partially offset by favorable rate variances on the new debt. Fiscal 2011 also includes $11,830 interest accretion and $585 deferred debt cost amortization related to the existing discount notes issued by Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, Inc. during the first quarter of fiscal 2011. The Predecessor period was negatively impacted by $3,000 in

 

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fees associated with a temporary bridge financing agreement, partially offset by the derecognition of $800 in previously recognized interest expense related to the termination of our pre-acquisition swap agreement. The following discussion of net interest expense has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Interest expense includes the cost of our debt obligations including the amortization of loan fees, adjustments to mark the interest rate swap agreements to fair value (for the Predecessor period only) and any interest income earned. Interest expense increased by $11,729, or 35.3%, to $44,931 for fiscal 2011 compared to the pro forma net interest expense of $33,202 for fiscal 2010, primarily as a result of the issuance of the existing discount notes discussed above. Accretion on discounted notes, which did not exist in the prior year period, increased interest expense by $11,830. Debt cost amortization expense for fiscal 2011, related to the issuance of the existing discount notes was $585.

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

There was an income tax benefit of $3,796 for fiscal 2011, an income tax benefit of $2,551 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), and we had an income tax benefit of $597 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor). The following discussion of income taxes has been prepared by comparing fiscal 2011 to the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations.

Provision for income taxes consisted of an aggregate income tax benefit of $3,796 for fiscal 2011 and a pro forma tax benefit of $884 for fiscal 2010. Our effective tax rate differs from statutory rates due to the deduction of FICA tip credits, state income taxes, and the impact of certain expenses, such as a portion of the transaction costs, that are not deductible for income tax purposes.

As a result of our experiencing cumulative losses before income taxes for the three-year period ended January 29, 2012, we have concluded that it is more likely than not that a portion of our federal and state deferred tax assets will not be fully realized. An increase in our valuation allowance for the year ending January 29, 2012, in the amount of $863 was made. The ultimate realization of our deferred tax assets is dependent on the generation of future taxable income during periods in which temporary differences and carryforwards become deductible. The change in the allowance is considered in the effective rate utilized to estimate interim income tax expense or benefit.

We follow accounting guidance for uncertainty in income taxes. This guidance limits the recognition of income tax benefits to those items that meet the “more likely than not” threshold on the effective date. As of January 29, 2012, we have accrued approximately $940 of unrecognized tax benefits and approximately $1,109 of penalties and interest. During fiscal 2011, we increased our unrecognized tax benefit by $59 and increased our accrual for interest and penalties by $166. Future recognition of potential interest or penalties, if any, will be recorded as a component of income tax expense. Because of the impact of deferred tax accounting, $940 of unrecognized tax benefits, if recognized, would impact the effective tax rate.

We file income tax returns which are periodically audited by various federal, state and foreign jurisdictions. We are generally no longer subject to federal, state or foreign income tax examinations for years prior to 2007.

Fiscal 2010 Compared to Fiscal 2009

Revenues

Total revenues were $343,533 for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), $178,006 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor), and $520,783 for fiscal 2009. Revenue mix for the Successor period was 51.5% food and beverage and 48.5% amusement and

 

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other, while during the Predecessor period the mix was 50.8% food and beverage and 49.2% amusement and other. Fiscal 2009 revenue mix was 51.8% food and beverage and 48.2% amusement and other. The following discussion of revenues has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Total pro forma revenues during fiscal 2010 increased by $756, or 0.1%, to $521,539 in fiscal 2010 from $520,783 in fiscal 2009.

The increased revenues were derived from the following sources:

 

Comparable stores

   $ (9,208

Non comparable stores-operating

     17,376   

Non comparable stores- flood-related closure of store in Nashville, Tennessee

     (7,415

Other

     3   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 756   
  

 

 

 

Comparable store revenue decreased by $9,208, or 1.9%, for fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009. Comparable special events revenues which accounted for 12.5% of consolidated comparable stores revenue for fiscal 2010 increased by 1.7% compared to fiscal 2009. The walk-in component of our comparable store sales declined by 2.4% for fiscal 2010. Comparable store revenues were impacted by the unfavorable macroeconomic environment.

Food sales at comparable stores decreased by $1,128, or 0.7%, to $168,521 in fiscal 2010 from $169,649 in fiscal 2009. Sales at our comparable stores continued to show a shift away from the beverage component of our business towards our amusements offerings. Beverage sales of comparable stores decreased 7.9% or $6,409 to $74,499 in fiscal 2010 from $80,908 in fiscal 2009. Comparable store amusements and other revenues decreased by $1,671 or 0.7% to $229,263 in fiscal 2010 from $230,934 in fiscal 2009.

Non-comparable store revenues increased by a total of $9,961. Increases in revenues from new stores opened and joint venture interest acquired since November 24, 2008, of $17,376 were partially offset by a $7,415 revenue reduction caused by the temporary flood-related closure of our store in Nashville, Tennessee.

Our revenue mix was 35.7% for food, 15.6% for beverage and 48.7% for amusement and other for fiscal 2010. This compares to 35.2%, 16.6% and 48.2%, respectively, for fiscal 2009.

Cost of products

Total cost of products for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $68,722 or 20.0% of total revenues, for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) they were $35,259 or 19.8% of total revenues, and cost of products were $104,137 or 20.0% of total revenues for fiscal 2009. The following discussion of cost of products has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Cost of food and beverage revenues decreased to $63,707 on a pro forma basis in fiscal 2010 from $65,349 in fiscal 2009 principally as a result of lower food and beverage revenue levels in 2010. Cost of food and beverage products, as a percentage of food and beverage revenues, decreased by 40 basis points to 23.8% of revenue for fiscal 2010 compared to 24.2% of revenue for fiscal 2009. Increased cost pressure in our produce, meat and seafood products was more than offset by reduced poultry, grocery and alcoholic beverage costs.

 

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Costs of amusement and other revenues increased to $40,274 in fiscal 2010 from $38,788 in fiscal 2009. As a percentage of amusement and other revenues, these costs increased by 40 basis points to 15.9% in fiscal 2010 compared to 15.5% of revenues in fiscal 2009. This increase is primarily a result of higher guest ticket redemption rates and an increase in utilization of game play purchased, partially offset by a reduction in the redemption cost per ticket redeemed and a price increase on redemption games.

Operating payroll and benefits

Operating payroll and benefits for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $85,271, $43,969 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and $132,114 for fiscal 2009. Operating payroll and benefits as a percentage of total revenues was 24.8%, 24.7% and 25.4% for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and fiscal 2009, respectively. The decrease in percentage of revenues from both the Successor and Predecessor periods of fiscal 2010 as compared to the fiscal 2009 percentage of revenues was driven primarily by initiatives designed to reduce hourly labor costs through improved scheduling, lower management costs resulting from an administrative centralization effort as well as labor savings associated with the realignment of the majority of our special events sales labor. These initiatives began in fiscal 2009 and therefore positively impacted both Predecessor and Successor periods of fiscal 2010. The following discussion of operating payroll and benefits has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Operating payroll and benefits decreased by $2,874, or 2.2%, to $129,240 in fiscal 2010 from $132,114 in fiscal 2009. Operating payroll and benefits as a percentage of revenues decreased by 60 basis points on a pro forma basis to 24.8% in fiscal 2010 compared to 25.4% in fiscal 2009. This decrease in percentage of revenue was primarily driven by the initiatives described above.

Other store operating expenses

Other store operating expenses for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $111,456, $59,802 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and $174,685 for fiscal 2009. Other store operating expenses decreased 110 basis points as a percentage of total revenues to 32.5% for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) from 33.6% for both the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and fiscal 2009. Other store operating expenses in the Successor period were favorably impacted by the recognition of $6,526 business interruption recoveries and gains from property related reimbursements stemming from the closure of our Nashville location due to flooding. This favorable variance was partially offset by an increase in occupancy expenses driven by recognizing our leaseholds at fair market value as required in purchase accounting. The following discussion of other store operating expenses has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Other store operating expenses decreased on a pro forma basis by $2,756, or 1.6%, to $171,929 in fiscal 2010 from $174,685 in fiscal 2009. Other store operating expenses as a percentage of revenues decreased 60 basis points to a pro forma 33.0% in fiscal 2010 from 33.6% in fiscal 2009. Other store operating expenses was negatively impacted by an increase in occupancy expenses discussed above, which was more than offset by recoveries from the closure of our Nashville location also discussed above.

General and administrative expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel, facilities, and professional expenses for the various departments of our corporate headquarters. General and administrative expenses for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $25,670, $17,064 for the

 

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120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and $30,437 for fiscal 2009. General and administrative expenses as a percentage of total revenues was 7.5%, 9.6% and 5.8% for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and fiscal 2009, respectively. The increase in general and administrative costs as a percentage of sales for both the Successor and Predecessor periods of fiscal 2010 is driven primarily by professional fees incurred as a result of the Acquisition of $4,638 and $4,280, respectively. The Predecessor period also includes $1,378 acceleration of stock-based compensation charges related to the Predecessor’s stock option plan. The following discussion of general and administrative expenses has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

General and administrative expenses increased by $2,350, or 7.7%, to $32,787 on a pro forma basis in fiscal 2010 from $30,437 in fiscal 2009. General and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenues increased to 6.3% in fiscal 2010 from 5.8% in fiscal 2009. The increase is due primarily to higher professional fees not related to the Acquisition, as well as increases in wages, taxes, benefits and severance.

Depreciation and amortization expense

Depreciation and amortization expenses for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $33,794, $16,224 for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and $53,658 for fiscal 2009. Depreciation and amortization expenses as a percentage of total revenues was 9.8%, 9.1% and 10.3% for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor), the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) and fiscal 2009, respectively. The decrease in depreciation and amortization costs as a percentage of total revenues for both the Successor and Predecessor periods of fiscal 2010 as compared to fiscal 2009 is driven primarily by certain operating assets being fully depreciated subsequent to the end of fiscal 2009. These decreases in the Successor period were partially offset by increased depreciation and amortization charges associated with fair value adjustments as a result of the Acquisition. Both the Successor and Predecessor periods in fiscal 2010 were negatively impacted by increases in depreciation from new store openings and maintenance capital expenditures. The following discussion of depreciation and amortization expenses has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Depreciation and amortization expense includes the depreciation of fixed assets and the amortization of trademarks with finite lives. Depreciation and amortization expense decreased $2,615, or 4.9%, to $51,043 on a pro forma basis in fiscal 2010 from $53,658 in fiscal 2009. Decreases in depreciation resulted from certain operating assets being fully depreciated subsequent to the end of fiscal 2009. These decreases were partially offset by increases in depreciation from new store openings and maintenance capital expenditures. Additionally, depreciation charges increased $861 in fiscal 2010 associated with a $29,130 write-up of certain assets as a result of fair value adjustments and changes of useful lives of certain assets made in connection with accounting for the Acquisition. Management estimates, based on asset and depreciation schedules existing as of the Acquisition date, that depreciation expense will be approximately $4,055, $8,537 and $5,226 greater in fiscal years 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively, related to the useful life and fair value adjustments discussed above. Management expects the remaining depreciation expense related to the fair value adjustment of approximately $10,451 will be incurred over approximately twenty years thereafter.

Pre-opening costs

Total pre-opening costs for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) were $842 or 0.2% of total revenues, for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) they were $1,447 or 0.8% of total revenues, and pre-opening costs were $3,881 or 0.7% of total revenues for fiscal 2009. The decrease in pre-opening costs as a percentage of total revenues in the Successor period of fiscal

 

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2010 is driven primarily by lower pre-opening costs associated with Roseville, a small format store which opened on May 3, 2010. The following discussion of pre-opening costs has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Pre-opening costs include costs associated with the opening and organizing of new stores or conversion of existing stores, including the cost of feasibility studies, pre-opening rent, staff training and recruiting, and travel costs for employees engaged in such pre-opening activities. Pre-opening costs decreased to $2,289 in fiscal 2010 from $3,881 in fiscal 2009. The decrease of pre-opening costs is primarily attributable to fewer store openings in fiscal 2010 as compared to fiscal 2009.

Interest expense, net

Total net interest expense for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) was $25,486 or 7.4% of total revenues, for the 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) it was $6,976 or 3.9% of total revenues, and net interest expense was $22,122 or 4.2% of total revenues for fiscal 2009. The increase in interest expense as a percentage of total revenues in the Successor period of fiscal 2010 is driven primarily by increased debt levels as a result of the Acquisition. The Successor period increase was also driven by higher debt cost amortization resulting from the Acquisition and new debt structure. The negative impact of higher debt levels on Successor period interest expense was partially offset by favorable rate variances on the new debt. The Predecessor period was negatively impacted by $3,000 in fees associated with a temporary bridge financing agreement, partially offset by $800 related to the termination of our pre-acquisition swap agreement. The following discussion of interest expense has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Interest expense includes the cost of our debt obligations including the amortization of loan fees, adjustments to mark the interest rate swap agreements to fair value net of and any interest income earned. Interest expense increased by $11,080 to $33,202 on a pro forma basis in fiscal 2010 from $22,122 in fiscal 2009 primarily as a result of the Acquisition. Increased debt levels discussed above elevated our interest expense year-to-date by approximately $8,800, on a pro forma basis. We also had increased debt cost amortization expense due to the Acquisition and lower levels of capitalized interest due to the timing of new store construction.

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

Provision for income taxes was a tax benefit for the 244 day period ended January 30, 2011 (Successor) and 120 day period ended May 31, 2010 (Predecessor) of $2,551 and $597, respectively, and a tax provision of $99 for fiscal 2009. The following discussion of provision for income taxes has been prepared by comparing the fiscal 2010 unaudited pro forma results of operations to fiscal 2009.

Provision for income taxes consisted of a tax benefit of $884 on a pro forma basis in fiscal 2010 and an income tax provision of $99 in fiscal 2009. Our effective tax rate differs from the federal corporate statutory rate due to the deduction for FICA tip credits, state income taxes and the impact of certain expenses, such as transaction costs, that are not deductible for income tax purposes.

In fiscal 2010, we recorded an increase to our net valuation allowance of $40 against our deferred tax assets. The valuation allowance was recorded in accordance with accounting guidance for income taxes. As a result of our experiencing cumulative losses before income taxes for the three-year period ending January 30, 2011, we could not conclude that it is more likely than not that our deferred tax asset will be fully realized. The ultimate realization of our deferred tax assets is dependent on the generation of future taxable income during periods in which temporary differences become deductible.

 

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The accounting guidance for uncertainty in income taxes limits the recognition of income tax benefits to those items that meet the “more likely than not” threshold on the effective date. As of January 30, 2011, we had approximately $881 of unrecognized tax benefits, including approximately $943 in potential interest and penalties. During fiscal 2010, we decreased our unrecognized tax benefit by $1,318. This decrease resulted primarily from tax positions taken in prior periods and the expiration of the statute of limitations. We currently anticipate that approximately $11 of unrecognized tax benefits will be recognized as a result of the expiration of statute of limitations during fiscal 2011. Future recognition of potential interest or penalties, if any, will be recorded as a component of income tax expense. Because of the impact of deferred income tax accounting, $836 of unrecognized tax benefits, if recognized, would affect the effective tax rate.

 

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Quarterly Results of Operations and Seasonality

The following table sets forth certain unaudited financial and operating data in each fiscal quarter during fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2010. The unaudited quarterly information includes all normal recurring adjustments that we consider necessary for a fair presentation of the information shown. This information should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

    Fiscal 2011—thirteen week period ended     Fiscal 2010—thirteen week period ended  
    Jan 29,
2012
    Oct 30,
2011
    Jul 31,
2011
    May 1,
2011
    Jan 30,
2011
    Oct 31,
2010
    Aug 1,
2010(1)
    May 2,
2010
 
    (Successor)     (Successor)    

(Successor)

   

(Successor)

    (Successor)     (Successor)     (Combined)     (Predecessor)  
                                        (Non-GAAP)        

Food and beverage revenues

  $
74,900
  
  $ 59,567      $ 63,877      $ 74,262      $ 72,012      $ 59,594      $ 64,551      $ 71,357   

Amusement and other revenues

    69,056        60,755        64,787        74,341        63,446        56,996        63,365        70,218   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

  $ 143,956      $ 120,322      $ 128,664      $ 148,603      $ 135,458      $ 116,590      $ 127,916      $ 141,575   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cost of food and beverage

  $ 17,710      $ 14,649      $ 15,440      $ 17,952      $ 16,707      $ 14,327      $ 15,396      $ 17,277   

Cost of amusement and other

    11,333        9,432        10,305        10,347        9,818        9,051        10,819        10,586   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs of products

    29,043        24,081        25,745        28,299        26,525        23,378        26,215        27,863   

Operating payroll and benefits

    35,045        30,552        31,012        34,266        32,871        30,516        32,385        33,468   

Other store operating expenses

    42,939        42,719        45,230        45,105        38,390        43,147        44,116        45,605   

General and administrative expense

    9,192        8,279        8,614        8,811        8,161        8,379        17,576        8,618   

Depreciation and amortization expense

    14,404        13,578        13,225        13,070        12,906        11,896        12,716        12,500   

Pre-opening costs

    1,428        587        1,431        740        452        371        277        1,189   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating costs

    132,051        119,796        125,257        130,291        119,305        117,687        133,285        129,243   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income (loss)

    11,905        526        3,407        18,312        16,153        (1,097     (5,369     12,332   

Interest expense, net

    11,363        11,468        11,443        10,657        8,321        8,388        10,405        5,348   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before taxes

    542        (10,942     (8,036     7,655        7,832        (9,485     (15,774     6,984   

Income taxes

    901        (4,338     (2,836     2,477        3,331        (3,257     (6,295     3,073   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ (359   $ (6,604   $ (5,200   $ 5,178      $ 4,501      $ (6,228   $ (9,479   $ 3,911   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stores open at end of period(2)(3)

    59        58        58        58 (4)      58 (4)      58 (4)      58 (4)      57 (4) 

Quarterly total revenues as a percentage of annual total revenues

    26.6     22.2     23.8     27.4     26.0     22.4     24.5     27.1

Change in comparable store sales

    0.8     -0.9     1.9     6.2     1.2     (1.3 )%      (4.8 )%      (2.5 )% 

 

(1)

The operating results for the thirteen weeks ended August 1, 2010 represent the combined 29 day period of the Predecessor and 62 day period of the Successor. The financial results for the Successor periods include the impacts of applying purchase accounting. The presentation of combined Predecessor and Successor operating results (which is simply the arithmetic sum of the Predecessor and Successor amounts) is a Non-GAAP presentation, which is provided as a convenience solely for the

 

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purpose of facilitating comparisons of current results with combined results over the same period in the prior year. See discussion above for details of items that are not comparable from application of purchase accounting.

(2) The number of stores includes one franchised store in Canada.
(3) Our location in Nashville, Tennessee, which temporarily closed from May 2, 2010 to November 28, 2011 due to flooding is included in our store count.
(4)