Taylor rule

Definition:

Describes how a central bank should adjust short-term interest rates (e.g. the Federal Funds rate) in response to inflation or output gaps. According to the rule, the interest rate should be increased if inflation rises above the target rate of inflation or if real GDP rises above trend GDP (increasing interest rates would squeeze credit supply to decrease demand and bring prices under control.) On the other hand, if inflation or real GDP fall below their target values, interest rates should be decreased. Proposed by economist John B. Taylor in 1993.

Investing Essentials


Copyright © 2011 Campbell R. Harvey, Professor of Finance, Fuqua School of Business at Duke University

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Earnings yield

The ratio of earnings per share, after allowing for tax and interest payments on fixed interest debt, to the current share price. The inverse of the price-earnings ratio. It is the total twelve... Read More

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